Joyous Expansion Podcast Transcript Kat Kim – Utilizing the Shame of Past Mistakes to Fuel Your Burning Desires

Brett Dupree:

Hello Kat Kim, and welcome to my podcast.

Kat Kim:

Hi Brett. It’s so good to be here.

Brett Dupree:

It’s so awesome to have you here. I have known you for a while now as we both graduated from Invite Change and gradually a little bit for me. I remember watching your graduation little speech that you gave and thought, wow, this person is special.

Kat Kim:

Thank you so much. Yeah, it Invite Change for people who don’t know is the coaching training that we both came out of, but we’ve known each other for several for many years. Right, and we’ve been Facebook friends for a long time as well, so it’s really cool to be on this podcast with you.

Brett Dupree:

It is. I went, I’ve been to a couple of your life things that you’ve done, and it’s always been fun watching you grow through the last 10 11 years since I’ve known you.

Kat Kim:

Yeah, yeah. There’s been a lot of growth for sure.

Brett Dupree:

That’s the fun part about life.

Both:

Oh yeah. It can be fun. It can be hell. It’s necessary. That is so true. Yeah.

Brett Dupree:

Well, let’s start with the nitty-gritty here. You are a convicted drug offender and crack addict.

Kat Kim:

Oh Wow. You went straight for it, didn’t you? Yes, I am. That was, that’s part of the growth that I was talking about. That can be hell yeah. There’s quite a bit of story there.

Kat Kim:

As you know how I’m a spiritual teacher and I’ve found a school called the School of Divine Confidence and I help emerging leaders and spiritual seekers and changemakers step into the best version of themselves so that they can go out there, come out of hiding and go out there and make a difference in the world. I did not all start that way for sure. I mean, I don’t even know where to begin with my story, but I can, I can backtrack all the way to when I was a young child, which is pretty, it’s common, right? We take in as young children, we were just sponges for the information, the conversations that are going around in our environment, whether it’s within our family unit or at school or media. We just take that all in and we start, we start assimilating all of this into our minds and it becomes such a part of who we are and most of the time, well, I wouldn’t say most of the time, so much of the time it is not, it isn’t healthy, it isn’t the healthy stuff that’s going in.

Kat Kim:

A lot of it is really, really toxic, and unhealthy depending on your family environment. I grew up in a pretty toxic environment. My mother began feeding me diet pills when I was six years old. I don’t remember. I really don’t remember if it’s because she wanted me to lose weight and so she was feeding me these diet pills or if it was because I was asking her to help me lose weight because I remember I actually remember seeking my mom’s help, mom, can you help me lose weight? So I don’t know which came first, but I definitely remember feeling really unworthy. I felt ugly. I felt fat. I felt this incredible pressure and desire to change myself and conform so that I could be like everyone else. I definitely felt this incredible, this feeling that there was something fundamentally wrong with me and all of this starting in second grade, you know, and thus began a lifelong struggle of low self-confidence, low self-image, and really, really unhealthy body image issues.

Kat Kim:

And I grew up in an emotionally abusive and physically abusive environment. So I started rebelling at a very young age and I started smoking and drinking at 13 I started doing hardcore drugs at 16 and by the time I was 18 I was selling cocaine. I was dealing and I was transporting it from Washington state to California on the plane. This is before 9/11 so man, Brett, you, and not even, it was so easy. It’s ridiculous how easy it was. It’s pathetic actually. How easy it was. I put it in my purse, you know, I put it in my suitcase, barely hit it. Of course, things are much more, the security is way different after 9/11 but it wasn’t difficult. I went to, yeah, I was, I got caught. I was handcuffed, put behind bars and I was suddenly facing three years in state prison.

Kat Kim:

And you know what, even at that time though, I didn’t care. I didn’t care what happened to me. I had such low self-esteem or low self-respect and regard for myself that it didn’t even scare me. I was absolutely fearless, but it wasn’t the type of fearlessness that comes from courage, you know? It wasn’t the type that comes from a calling. It was just an absolute who is a dangerous type of self-loathing and self disrespect that comes from not giving a shit what happens to my life and my future and my body. There I was, and even while I was in jail, I was trying to make drug deals and I was trying to just take people down with me. I had, I wasn’t necessarily, my intention wasn’t to take people down with me. I never had, I’ve never had that type of intention. It was just that I didn’t care what happened to me. It was a very, very reckless, yeah.

Brett Dupree:

One thing I’ve heard on this podcast multiple times as a verbal abuse as a child, and I was wondering if you’re willing to elaborate on how that looks.

Kat Kim:

Gosh, the verbal abuse, I’m trying to think of very specific things. The verbal abuse came with physical abuse. You know, I was hit a lot. I was, you know like I said, I was fed diet pills. Oh, I do remember, you know, cause I was just six years old, I could barely reach over the counter and my mom would take the pills out and she would cut them in half. I was very curious. I was just thinking, I remember asking her, I was like, why are you cutting these in half? And she said, well these big ones are for adults and you’re only a child so you only need half of them. And I just, that I accepted what was going on in this exchange and this dynamic that I needed to be fixed as a child and I had to take pills.

Kat Kim:

I needed something outside of me to fix what was wrong with me on the inside. And this is what my mother, you know, this is something that my mother was telling me, whether it was indirect or direct, you know, and I think abuse comes in so many forms. There wasn’t so much a verbal, of course, there were, I guess it’s, you know, some times Brett, some of this stuff is so internalized that you don’t even know if it’s your parents saying them to you or if it’s just my own self. But definitely I was led to believe that there’s just something fundamentally wrong with me.

Brett Dupree:

So based on the actions of your parents, it almost created the verbal abuse inside your head.

Kat Kim:

Absolutely. Yeah, absolutely. That’s how, and you know, that’s, that’s how sensitive and prime our young minds are when we’re out in the world and we’re taking in all this information, there is a message that we’re receiving, even if it’s indirect.

Kat Kim:

And with everything that’s going out in the world right now and all the media and I, man, I have to say, I’m so glad I grew up in my era before all of this social media came out, I would have been caught. So I was already caught by the law, but it would’ve been so much worse if he always caught on Instagram stories or on a Facebook live doing half the stuff that I did. So I almost feel blessed that I grew up in the time that I grew up in and there’s no real physical evidence floating around on the interwebs. Of me making crazy mistakes what kids go through now, taking in all of that media and Snapchat and all of that is just insane. The types of messages that they’re taking in, especially in this culture. And this is kind of where I speak a lot about this.

Kat Kim:

You might’ve heard me talk about how we live in a consumer culture that really brainwashes us into believing that there’s again, that there’s something fundamentally wrong with us and that we need to conform and by something outside of us in order for us to be okay. So this struggle to, to reclaim your power and your confidence is really for me, in the work that I do, it’s about liberating ourselves from the demands of the consumer culture. First. We really have to become aware of it. And we have to be able to call it out when we see it. Otherwise, we’re constantly, it’s like the sea that we swim it. We can’t escape all of the media and all the advertising. There’s no way we can escape it, but we have to be hyper-vigilant and aware of how powerful it is and that it’s an every, you know, wait a minute though, I don’t do this anymore cause I stopped doing it, but even just a few months ago, the first thing I would do is pick up my cell phone when I wake up and I turn it on and I’m scrolling, I’m scrolling through the Inbox, I’m scrolling through Facebook and it’s like right at that moment, that precious moment between sleep and being awake when your subconscious mind is so open and receptive, what am I doing?

Kat Kim:

I’m picking up my phone and I’m feeding it all the ads that keep popping up all these offers and it’s just, wow. I was like, I need to stop that. I need to not let that be the first thing I do when I wake up. But we had to be aware. We have to be aware of it. We can’t escape it entirely, but we have to become aware of it if we want to find it.

Brett Dupree:

I think the funny thing is growing up, I always learned the AI was going to be the scary thing because it’s going to determine humans aren’t worthy and kill us all, but the reality is what AI does now is pretty much figure out how to sell us things in ways that are so crazy that once I woke up with my left shoulder hurting, I never talked about it, but for some reason, Facebook showed me an ad for a sling.

Kat Kim:

Oh yeah. Wow. Wow. That’s insane. It’s where we’re headed. It’s absolutely where we are headed and you know, Facebook itself has that. What did, oh, the name that they call it. It slips my mind right now. The funnel, you know when Echo Echo Chamber, right? We turn on Facebook and we scroll. This is not just Facebook, it’s when we go on Google, there’s an echo chamber wherein our own little bubble, and we, each of us has our, have created our own little reality depending on the things that we talk about and search. It’s dangerous if we’re not aware of this because then we become so closed off to the world outside of us and we become really focused on just our internal thoughts and our internal world and we become so disconnected with humans and other people and others parts of the world and how they think, you know? And we see that right now and with people just fighting all the time on social media or politics. Right. And it’s just a really sad, yeah.

Brett Dupree:

We actually have algorithms to change the headlines of stories based on your political views.

Kat Kim:

Wow. Wow. Absolutely. Yeah. Brett. And so these are the things that we have to become awakened to. I think you know, my work is primarily about helping people step into their calling and finding their confidence and reclaiming their power. Part of that for me, as I said earlier, is so much about being aware of what were the things that you’re talking about. We have to be aware of that because if we’re not there, we’re constantly thinking, what’s, what’s wrong with me? What’s wrong with me? Well, the thing is we’re being fed all the things that tell us what’s wrong with us, and so we have to liberate ourselves from that. I strongly believe that we have to really begin the journey of liberating ourselves from the demands of the consumer culture and whether that’s consuming products are that consuming media, whether that’s consuming information, it’s all-consuming.

Brett Dupree:

That makes sense to what you were saying earlier about being at a young age and wanting to fit in, especially at the age of around eight or nine is when we stop, start separating ourselves with our parents and start defining ourself from a peer group that people around us and wanting to fit in there.

Kat Kim:

Yep, absolutely. I think also being a person of color, you know, and I didn’t even realize this until just a couple of days ago as I was kind of reminding myself of my time when I was six or seven years old, I was surrounded by, I was like the only Asian girl in my class. Maybe there was another Asian girl. I distinctly remember thinking, I have to look like all my white friends without even knowing. Right. I wasn’t aware. I wasn’t even thinking that she’s white and I’m Asian. And it wasn’t even like that. It was just that there was something about them that felt right. And I had to learn how to be like that and that there was something wrong about me.

Brett Dupree:

Oh, I understand that as being, I mean, there weren’t very many well Mulatto kids growing up. And so I had that with the white kids and the group of black kids as well, that I was, no matter what, always different, always kind of on the outside and having to justify my amazing fro.

Kat Kim:

Yeah. Yeah. I totally relate to that. I completely, completely relate to that. Yeah. In fact. So yeah, I’ve always felt like an outsider, not quite this nor that, you know, I think there’s a part of me that’s just kind of naturally that way anyway. I think I was born into this world to be a bit of a nonconformist cause I just don’t really follow, I don’t like to follow the herd and wherever the herd is going, like, Eh, and I’ll go the opposite way sometimes is not necessarily a good thing. It’s just kind of a natural thing I do. But I realize that there are a lot of people who feel this way. I call myself a misfit, a nonconformist. And so a lot of the work that I do is really about helping people like you or me who’s never really felt like they fit in, who’s always felt like they’re an outsider. Those are the people that I really, really, really, really love working with and helping them to come out of hiding and step into, you know, they’re calling to make an impact in the world. That’s my favorite. I am such a champion for nonconformists and misfits.

Brett Dupree:

Well, that’s one thing I want to start with this podcast, and this is one reason why I like interviewing people. Awesome people like you is just having people like you tell their story and making people recognize, holy crap, I am not alone, because that’s where most of my life, that’s how I felt. I felt that was the only person going through this issue. The only person with extreme social anxiety, the only person that could be understood. If I had heard that I wasn’t the only one at the age of 15 that would have been amazing.

Kat Kim:

Yeah. Well, I think what you’re doing is really, really great. Absolutely. Yeah. Yeah. You know, it was, it’s crazy because people see me now and they think, I mean, when I tell my story about being a convicted drug offender, I would, when I was a crack addict, it was insane. You know, I was a social degenerate. I was homeless for a while. I went to jail. He was arrested in Oakland. It’s like notorious at that time for being one of the most dangerous cities in the United States, notorious for its high rates of homicides and violent crimes. That’s the type of experience I was attracting to myself because you know, that’s what happens with it. We bring into our life experiences that validate our internal beliefs to be true whether those beliefs are true or not because I thought I was unworthy because I thought I was that I didn’t matter.

Kat Kim:

I attracted everything into my life that validated those beliefs to be true. Whether it was being arrested or getting involved with it, relationships with men that were abusive or just doing, I mean, I’ve made so many mistakes. I’ve made so many mistakes and I that I had carried, I have carried a lot of shame around because I thought I was this person who was just bad. I was just a bad person, a bad little girl. That was the message I received and now that I talk about it, that was actually the verbal. I did receive the verbal like you are a bad girl, bad girl. You know, you are such a bad girl, you’re so you should feel lucky that you have a home and whatever. You know there was telling me that I’m a bad girl and there was a lot of guilt that was also tied in with that because I’m a bad girl and I have a home and I have all these things that I should feel lucky and you know all that stuff. You know the whole man, these beliefs, gosh, and for anyone who’s doing transformative work, these are the beliefs that we have to uncover because they control us. They’re deep in our unconscious mind and they dictate how we think and feel and how we behave, whether we were aware of it or not.

Brett Dupree:

That is so true. Awareness is always is the first step towards change.

Kat Kim:

Yeah, that’s what I say. Hey, absolutely. Awareness is always the first step to transformation. Always. No matter what.

Brett Dupree:

So one thing that just got me thinking is looking at you. The last thing I think is somebody who went through drug addiction. It’s not because of who you are is mostly because of the pictures that are put into my head through media of what a crack addict is.

Kat Kim:

Wow. That’s interesting that you say that. Yeah, and there’s a stigma, you know, and Gosh Man, I’m kind of just pausing because that’s such a big statement because again, it’s media putting out to us images of what a crack addict is or what a homeless person is or what a black person is or what an Asian person is or what a white man is. Do you know? Do you know what I mean? Like it’s this, it’s, it’s this, it’s this conditioning of visual images and words where we begin to take that in and just we create our reality with that when it’s completely, completely wrong in so many cases, I’m not saying it’s always wrong, you know, there’s some good media outlets who try to do their best in storytelling, but, and truth-telling you, man, this is really, there’s a lot of false narratives out there.

Brett Dupree:

It can be a really insidious number one time. I’m not proud of once I had this thought, but I remember getting into a bus and the bus driver was as gorgeous Asian woman, and my first thought you are way too attractive to be driving a bus.

Kat Kim:

Yeah. You know what Brett? So let me tell you, this is a story. It just popped into my mind. I had no intention of sharing this. But that’s an example of a type of racism where it’s like the model minority. Obviously I’m Asian and here’s, so let me just backtrack. Here is where I experienced racism on different, vary on different levels at the same time. So when I got arrested, I’m not even a go into all the crazy details. Just when I got arrested, I ended up on a shuttle bus. When I came off the airplane from Oakland Airport, I had my luggage with me. I got onto a shuttle bus and I was headed to my apartment and the shuttle bus driver was a brown man and he ended up dropping everybody off. Somehow I ended up being the last person to be dropped off and I was in the front seat and telling you as I said earlier, you attract people, experiences into your life that validate your beliefs to be true.

Kat Kim:

So somehow I started talking to this guy and we started talking about drugs. How crazy is that? You know, I just got off the plane and now we’re talking about illegal substances. And I said, Oh yeah, I have some. And he was like, really? And I was like, yeah, want some? So this guy pulls over the shuttle bus. It’s a commercial truck. It’s labeled as a shuttle bus, you know? And so he pulls it over into the Oakland hills. Apparently that’s where I was. And it’s dark, I think. Or it’s like dusk. It was not completely light. I just remember it starting to get dark and he pulls over and he was like, yeah, let’s do it. I said, okay. So I pulled some out and I gave him some, I didn’t do any, but he took a piece of paper and he started doing the cocaine thing, which is, I don’t want to get into those details, but he started snorting cocaine in the car behind the driver’s seat and all of a sudden, right when he was doing that, we saw a flashlight into the window and it was a cop and the cop was like knocking on the door.

Kat Kim:

He was like, what are you guys doing in there? And he threw the guy at the bus driver. He threw the coke into the middle of the, between my seat in his seat just in the middle there because you know what else is going to do it. So he just threw it down. And long story short, there were two cops that came. They ended up arresting the guy. Okay. He did get caught red-handed with the cocaine. But here’s what happened, which kind of was the beginning of just a weird, I don’t know. I, I learned a lot from this experience, not just at that moment, but years and years and years and years afterward. In hindsight, they arrested him, they let me go. They’re like, Hey, what are you doing? You know, you should be, you need to be careful. And I, they’re like here, just sit down here.

Kat Kim:

And I sat down on a rock and I was watching this whole thing unfold before me and I heard him, you know, read his Miranda rights to this guy and they arrested him. And I had cocaine in my purse. And so I was like, what am I gonna do? So I took it out from my purse without them seeing me and I threw it behind a rock that I was sitting on. And as this all was kind of unfolding, I had suddenly a really, really, really strong voice that came into my head. And I am a spiritual teacher now. But at that time, I didn’t believe in God. I had a really bad experience with God and church, so completely denounced it. And for many years after, I still didn’t believe in God. But at that moment I heard a voice and the words were, the truth will set you free.

Kat Kim:

And I was like, oh my God, are you serious right now? And it was so strong. And at that moment it was like, oh yeah, that was a voice from God. Even though I didn’t believe in God and all of a sudden in something completely took over me, I wasn’t even worried. I heard that voice, the truth will set you free. And then I also had this deep, deep sense of, and knowing that I was the one that was supposed to take ownership of this and that I was the one to go and that I would be okay. So I told the cops, officers, actually that cocaine is mine. And they were like, what? And they’re like, you should go, you should just please let him go, take me instead. And they were just like dumbfounded. They’re like, well, cause they had already booked him. They had already put him inside the car. And I was like, no, it really is mine. And I went behind the rock, I pulled out the stash and I threw back there and I was like, look, it’s mine. And then at that point, you know there.

Kat Kim:

So I was like, please release him, take me. And then the next set of events that happened, I just remember one of the cops taking him out and saying, I remember him saying, the cop saying to the guy, this is your lucky day. And then they let him go and he left. And then they had to deal with me. One of the cops who was a, he was another Asian man, but he was like, why are you doing this? And I said, it’s just, I don’t know, but it’s mine. It’s just my stuff. I have more in my suitcase. And he was like, wow, you know, I just, I actually just wanted to take you out for drinks or dinner. And I’m like, mmm, that’s nice. But I just remember that comment being made, this whole thing, I guess this all kind of relates to being a person of color.

Kat Kim:

Even though I’m a person of color, I was still treated better than black and brown people. Do you know what I mean? And so there’s these layers and layers of just kind of racism and experiences of racism that had been both positive but also being a model minority. It’s like, ah, it’s better, you know? But it all kind of also ties into not being white, nor I’m not black, obviously, it’s, and in the conversation that’s happening around race today and on most days it’s about black and white. And so it’s this another experience of how do I fit into this? I don’t really fit in as another experience of feeling kind of like an outsider. And so again, still trying to find my way as a minority who’s a model minority or I mean not a model, not black nor white, you know. Anyway, I mean, long story, I kind of went off on a tangent there, but I ended up going to jail. That’s how he got caught. I kind of turned myself in.

Brett Dupree:

Oh Wow. So that’s very interesting. It’s one thing that has come over my podcast, uh, multiple times is almost as divine guidance and it was almost like divine guidance was that this is your point to turn it around this, this is where I’m going to come through.

Kat Kim:

I love that. That’s exactly what it was for sure.

Brett Dupree:

So after you got caught, how did you start taking your past experiences into becoming the founder of the School of the Divine Confidence?

Kat Kim:

That’s a journey of course, and I’m still on that journey, but essentially I had to get really clear about who I was being called to be as a woman. That wasn’t even my wake up call, by the way, going to jail wasn’t my wake up call. My wake up call happened many, many, many, many years after I had, you know, I went to jail, I cleaned up. I still was carrying those deep, deep thoughts and feelings of not being good enough. So even though I stopped doing drugs, I was still getting involved in attracting toxic, abusive men into my life. I was depressed, I was still not talking to anybody. And it wasn’t until I was walking down my hallway, this is now many years after going to jail and I was going to my elevator and there was, there’s this mirror, this big huge mirror that was on the wall across the elevator door.

Kat Kim:

And as I walked to the elevator door, I caught a glimpse of someone. She was standing there and she was really frumpy. Her hair was disheveled and she had, her face was like so puffy and swollen and it looked like she had some sort of rash or assisting acne or something. And it was more than just how she looked though there was this really deep depressing energy that was coming from her. And at that moment, even though I was just wallowing in my own toxicity and depression and self-hate, I saw her and I was like, oh my God, at least I’m not that bad. And then it hit me like a ton of bricks that I was actually looking at myself in the mirror.

Brett Dupree:

Oh Wow.

Kat Kim:

Yeah. I had become so disconnected with the woman that I know in my heart that I was being called to be. And the person that I was actually showing up as those two is so disconnected that I didn’t even recognize myself in the mirror and I saw myself. That was my turning point. That’s when I decided I would do whatever it takes to become the woman that I wanted to be. I wanted to walk into a room and have people notice me, not for how I looked, but for my substance in for my character, I wanted to make an impact and do important things and transform lives. That was my secret burning desire, so this is one of the key things for people who just know in their bones. They have a secret burning desire and it’s a secret because they feel at that moment that it’s something they can’t do. It’s so out of their league, that it’s like they don’t share it with anybody because it’s such a vulnerable thing to share because you know because we think people are going to laugh at us.

Kat Kim:

Right. That was what I wanted so badly. I decided at that moment I would do whatever it takes to become that person. I became a professional image consultant, not because I wanted to be an image consultant, but I really immersed myself in the studies of body image and style and color and how to transform our appearance in a way that matches who we are on the inside. And then then I became a nationally certified personal trainer where I began studying what the physical body goes through to undergo a transformation. I lost a bunch of weight. I began taking care of myself and showing up in a different way, dressing differently. That really matched more of who I knew I was on the inside and I became a transformative life coach through the same training that you went to, you know, where we are on studying the mindset and how our thoughts and our feelings all impact our behaviors.

Kat Kim:

Right? And my quest for transformation on the outside, kept on taking me deeper and deeper inside and I began studying spirituality and metaphysics and consciousness and energy and you know, I became a licensed spiritual practitioner. I’m currently one foot in the ministerial path, you know, we’ll see how far that goes. But I do feel like I’m being called to share what I have learned about spirituality and power that is innately within each and every one of us, and so that’s why I combined all of these, my backgrounds and my experiences overcoming addiction and abuse and body image and bullying and depression. That’s how I started the school of divine confidence because I wanted to help people just like myself who’ve never felt like they fit in, but they know in their bones that they’re here to do something important. I want them to be able to step into that power and answer that call.

Brett Dupree:

What do you love most about this being a co-founder of the School of Divine Confidence?

Kat Kim:

Just what I said here is that I get to see people, one of my clients said this about me a long time ago and it’s kind of stuck with me, so you know Professor X in Wolverines, excellent. Sorry, x men. He said that I am like Professor X and I was like, oh my God, yes, I have this school. I work with mutants, people who never really fit into society. In this way or that way. They always felt like an outcast. I really do have a gift of being able to pinpoint those people and draw out their natural strength and their skills and their abilities, even though they feel like there’s something wrong with them. I’m really good at teaching them and showing them how everything that they think is wrong with them is, is exactly what they need to fuel their secret burning desire to step out and do their thing in the world. Because that’s what I did. Right? I feel like that’s what I love the most, is seeing that moment where they’re, oh my God, I can, I can do it. I have that power.

Brett Dupree:

Do they also have cool nicknames?

Kat Kim:

I should. We should do that.

Brett Dupree:

So we’re coming to the end of our interview together. And one thing I love to ask my interviewees is for one minute of motivation, you think of this as if you have a time machine and travel back to your eight-year-old self, but you only have one minute to convey a message to change your life forever or just condense your life purpose message down to a minute.

Kat Kim:

Oh, dear. Okay, well I know that even though you feel pain, even though you feel shame, even though you feel regret for making mistakes or for not doing the thing that you think you should be doing, I know with 100% certainty that all of those things that you feel pain and shame about, those are actually going to fuel you. They are purposeful and they are divine and all of those things are going to point you in the right direction of your true calling and I know with 100% certainty that when you step into your divine calling that you become the answer to someone’s prayer.

Brett Dupree:

That is so beautiful. Thank you, Kim, for coming to my podcast. It has been an honor for me to have you on here listening to your story of how you went through such harrowing experiences of something that this square can’t understand, to being able to transform that into helping people reach their full potential in ways that they probably can’t even imagine. I find it extremely inspiring. So thank you so much for sharing your story with us as well as your service to making this world a better place.

Kat Kim:

Oh, you are so welcome Brett. I’m so, I’d loved our time together and I also just wanted to mention that one of the things that have helped me is I discovered a really easy one question that helps me move through these moments and I actually created an audio training, a free audio training. Can I share it with you guys cause I would love you guys to be able to get access to this if you want? It’s called from shame to confidence, how to reclaim your personal power with one magical question and I kid you not. This question for me has been the thing that has helped me to overcome the shame and the guilt that I feel around topics like being a convicted drug offender or getting an abortion or making financial mistakes. I have made so many mistakes but I have found that they really are purposeful and there’s a way to use those experiences to drive you into stepping into your true callings. I created this free audio training. It’s for half an hour and you can get access to that at www.KatKim.com/ShameToConfidence. And it’s one word, shame to confidence.

Brett Dupree:

I’m sure that will help people. So thank you for coming on.

Kat Kim:

Thank you, Brett. I’ll see you soon.

Inspirational Life Coach Brett Dupree (255 Posts)

Internationally certified life coach through inviteCHANGE, Brett Dupree envisions a powerful future in which people live in pure joy. He believes that there is a great transformation just around the corner and he coaches people on how to use passion and inspiration to ride the powerful wave of awakening that is sweeping this world. Brett has dedicated his life to the study of personal empowerment. He believes that real lasting change comes from changing from the inside out. Working with you one-on-one, Brett helps you listen to your inner voice to reach your goals with passion, inspiration and ease . He creates a sacred space that allows you clients to bask in the joy of creation. He will help you find peace and balance in their lives so you can transform yourself into a self leader. Using the power of intentions, the Law of Attraction and his deep loving powerful heart he helps his clients gain miraculous results.


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