Joyous Expansion Podcast Transcript Travis Wingfield – Getting Your Dream Job By Hard Work and Pursuing Your Passions

Brett Dupree:

Hello, Travis. And welcome to my podcast.

Travis Wingfield:

Hey Brett. Thanks for having me. It’s been a long time coming. I’m glad to be joining you.

Brett Dupree:

I am excited to have you on, why don’t you tell the listeners a little bit of who you are?

Travis Wingfield:

So my name is Travis. I work for the Miami Dolphins, which is crazy to hear me say out loud, still to this day, I pretty much tried to find my way into the football media landscape for the first 30 or so years of my life. Didn’t really have much success with that, but eventually started finding niche projects to do and got myself into this position, which I’m sure you and I will go over Brett. So I worked for the Dolphins, but I live out by where you are in Washington state. We are moving later this month to South Florida to make that full time, jump into that job. And I’m looking forward to that. I live at home now with my wife and my one-month-old daughter. So things are going pretty good for us out here, despite all the chaos of 2020.

Brett Dupree:

Yeah. It’s been very exciting. Something I don’t talk about much on my, on my podcast because it was all about personal development and people’s lives is that I am a gigantic dolphin fan watching Travis go from somebody who was just like me. Some idiot on a bulletin board to talking to the Miami Dolphins has been a wild ride and has been really fun, cheering them along the way. So let’s start at the beginning back when you were just like me irregular, nobody talking about the Miami Dolphins on bulletin board, you always wanted to get into this was your dream was to get into sports broadcasting or something along those lines.

Travis Wingfield:

It’s a dream that I would say was more of like a delayed dream or maybe one of those dreams that you just never really considered pursuing seriously. I mean, you mentioned, you know, being a nobody, I mean, I’m still a, nobody, let’s be honest. No one knows who I am. But as far as pursuing the actual dream itself, it was something that I always just thought was one of those things, like almost like an athlete, you know, like you’re not going to play professional football, Travis, you weigh 150 pounds. Like you’re not going to play football for a living. I just thought you didn’t get yourself into that position. When I was 16 years old, I took my first ever gig. I guess, if you want to call it, it wasn’t paid. But I got to write about the Dolphins and that’s what I loved to do.

Travis Wingfield:

I was so fascinated by the game of football and I loved the written word and storytelling. So I really wanted to get into it at that time. And that’s when I did join those message boards that you and I were both so active on back in those days, Brett, when message boards were a little more popular than they are now took my first ever gig with, I think it was actually the finsider, which is a bit of irony because I don’t have a good relationship with the finsider right now. I think that’s what it was back when I was 16 years old. And I’ll never forget my first article writing about Ronnie Brown and Ricky Williams, the two running backs that shared the backfield there in Miami. It’s just kind of, I guess, progressed from there. And there were plenty of stops along the way, but yeah, back when I was in high school, that’s I wanted to be in sports somehow and the Dolphins were my favorite teams. So that kind of narrowed the focus, but I don’t think it was ever something I really thought could happen. You know,

Brett Dupree:

He started this at 16 of writing. Did you go to college for writing at all or did you just keep on going, what was your path like

Travis Wingfield:

The problem With my adolescents, I suppose, was that I just didn’t really have the motivation or the drive to really capitalize on what high school is. And so I didn’t take my grades seriously. I didn’t take education seriously. I went to a junior college after high school, but I had never had any intentions of taking it seriously. And so after a semester or two, I dropped out and started working really low-end jobs that just were taking me nowhere at the time I was going into general studies. I, like I said, I had, I had no focus on what I wanted to do. Writing was something that I just did on the message boards in my spare time for fun. It’s what I enjoyed to do. And I will get there eventually, I suppose, here. But at that time it wasn’t really in my mind, no.

Brett Dupree:

What was the next step? Because one thing I remember from the early days, one thing that generally set you apart from other people posting is you started to actually look at tape. You started to make little gifs and you started to do those things. What got you into actually trying to break down the game of football

Travis Wingfield:

That started to come a little bit later. I would say the next step was continuing on that message board with you, Brett. And the remember those little badges we had where it was like premium member or columnist or draft guru. I was so intrigued by getting these online notes of like certification, so to speak. And I remember when they, I can’t remember it was finheaven or thephins.com first said, do you want to write for the front page? And I was like, wow, this is, you know, this is my home. This is like my sanctuary. And now they want me to be like on the face of it. I thought it was so cool. And so I did that and I really started to focus my writing on being grammatically correct, or at least spelling words. Right. And not taking the, you know, shortcuts of texts like you would with your buddies when you’re texting on the phone.

Travis Wingfield:

I took it really seriously then, but you mentioned getting into the film stuff that didn’t really start in earnest until 2016. When Sam from also the message boards, the host of the perfectVille podcast for the Miami Dolphins fan podcast, he had reached out to me about writing for his website in 2016. And that’s kind of where the journey began. If you want me to go into the film stuff now, or you want to continue on that path that I guess that’s up to you.

Brett Dupree:

Let’s continued to up the path.

Travis Wingfield:

Yeah, it was 2016. When Sam reached out and said, Hey, we’re looking to get a written portion for perfectVille. The welcome to perfectville podcast. We want to have a website. And as you know, now, Brett, how just almost, I guess, psychopathic, I am about how diligent and how much work I want to produce.

Travis Wingfield:

I was the same way then. And so he asked me to write one article a week and that turned into five articles a week because I just loved doing it so much. And then from there I started listening to their podcast and thought, you know, I’ve always been a big fan of like am sports radio. And I lived in Seattle back when I was really into it, listened to Brock and Salk. And I listened to those three programs back to back to back every day at work. When I lived there, I kind of drew on that experience and talked to Sam and Chris, the host of the perfectVille podcast, and thought I could do this. It would be fun to do. And I think a new audio platform would be fun for me to do. And so I reached out to Kevin Dern, who also from the message board once again, and he agreed to do the podcast with me and we started a podcast called the Finalysis a horrible pun, I know, but we wanted to be different in the way that you podcasts tend to be a little more easy-going lighthearted and can be a little bit more entertaining, but we really wanted to bring that, but also focus on the details of football because we thought that that was a space that was lacking in podcast and sports podcast in particular. And so that vision really kind of sparked my Twitter presence, which at the time I think I had a hundred or 200 followers and I saw that people were tweeting, but there’s not really much of a film presence, a video presence where people can break downplays. And I’m actually looking at my Twitter deck right now, my tweet deck right now, I’m looking at two consecutive tweets where someone’s breaking down video. So I don’t know if it grew from there, like just in the general sphere, but at that time nobody was doing it.

Travis Wingfield:

And I knew that there was personally for me, I wanted to see it with my eyes and visualize it, but also hear someone talk about it and kind of get those two points of contact in terms of teaching me the game. And I was so intrigued by football and just 22 of the world’s greatest athletes playing the biggest game of chess, just, just always has really brought my attention to the game. And so those two things coming together and the pursuit of trying to get my name out there, once I realized that podcasting was a thing, and there were so many Dolphins, podcasts and different Dolphins fans on Twitter that had these followings. It just, it all kind of at once hit me that I wanted to focus my attention on this potential career, I guess, hobby at the time now as turn career.

Brett Dupree:

I wonder if the Dolphins just have more pun-based podcasts than any other team. I’m curious about that transition from kind of sounded like at the beginning, you’re kind of just coasting through life, not really putting a focus on it, but something about just working on this really sounds like something really clicked what clicked to make you want to really be diligent and work very hard on it.

Travis Wingfield:

I think you’ve pretty much hit the nail on the head. And I think that passion is the only word that can really accurately describe it. And I think that’s so important in life is just to, if you don’t love what you do, Brett, how are you ever going to do the best job you could possibly do? Because, you know, you mentioned kind of coasting through life. I’ve had jobs that were peers, your X amount of dollars per month, and you can earn commissions on top of that. And that was always like kind of the grabber that brought you in was, Oh, if I work this hard and I can see this through, and then three or four months into the job, you realize you hate doing it. So you’re not motivated if you’re not motivated by money to do it, then you find yourself just kind of waffling and falling into this pattern of complacency.

Travis Wingfield:

And I didn’t want that for myself. And the older I got, the more I realized that my past, not transgressions, but past laziness, I suppose really bred this life that I didn’t want to live. I thought if I’m going to make a change in my life, it’s going to have to be something that I’m super passionate about. And so the writing aspect of things like there was, I’ve probably conceived twenty-five novel ideas, Brett, I probably conceive 25 script ideas or television shows. Like I always knew there was something creative and writing and something that could just really challenge my brain and kind of makes me my own boss, I guess, type of job. And those things never came to fruition. And then the podcast came about. And so you marry this desire to be creative and this desire to put pen to paper as it were with this passion for the game of football, those two things just collided. And this light went off. This is what I’m supposed to be doing and not wasting my time doing restoration or working for a staffing agency or working in insurance, all these different jobs that I worked that just never, ever resonated with me. And the minute I realized what I wanted to do in football, it was, I mean, it was a hundred miles an hour full steam ahead.

Brett Dupree:

Things weren’t going your way. Sometimes it happens as you pursue your passion was that passion was really just kept you going.

Travis Wingfield:

Yeah. I mean, it’s, I think it’s like anything, I would assume not having the knowledge of other industries, but this is a, you just go on Twitter right now and you can find people that are trying to crack into it. You mentioned all the podcast puns, there’s gotta be 50 Dolphins podcast out there that I’ve heard of. Even not, that’s not the ones that are just kind of doing their own thing. You have to really kind of carve out this niche role in this capacity or this industry that makes you stand out. And I think the desire to do that and to really get the recognition that I thought that I deserved at the time and also that passion to just keep going. Cause we can talk about it. There was countless letdowns along the way that I was just like, man, what am I doing? Because I was working jobs while I started this. And then at one point, I wasn’t working and I was just focusing on that. And at that time when I would face adversity that man that’s when times would get difficult sometimes. But yeah, the passion was really what fueled me to just kinda persevere.

Brett Dupree:

Are you willing to talk about one of those things that knocked you down and how you got yourself back up?

Travis Wingfield:

Yeah, certainly it’s actually kind of funny how full circle it comes because I was doing the podcast with what’s called locked on Dolphins. It’s part of the locked on podcast network and they have every sport. Every team has a host. It’s basically like a local podcast. That’s the idea is to replace am Radio was kind of the mission statement. I loved that job. I love doing it at the same. It was a nice side hustle. If, if that’s what we’re going to call it, it wasn’t something that would bring home family raising type of income or something that I could support myself on. Even for the rest of my life. It was just at, at the time I had the time and a little bit of extra money to get me through that time so I could try it. And so I was always trying to extend myself to other opportunities.

Travis Wingfield:

I applied for an assistant job to Andy Benoit of sports illustrated, who was really into the X’s and O’s. And I got myself up into this finalist stage of these like spreadsheets. He was having us breakdown and I thought I was going to get it. And I got runner up and didn’t get the job. And I was like, man, that was my end. That was my chance to really break into the industry. And then about a year later, my buddy Antwan who wrote for Dolphins wired.com, he was leaving that gig and he had recommended me to take over for him. I took that to mean that I was going to get that job. And so I was talking to my wife about next steps because if we’re going to do a Dolphins website and a Dolphins podcast, and I want to continue to grow this, maybe it’s time to think about relocating and get local so I can more access to the team.

Travis Wingfield:

And so these life changes were kind of starting to click in my head. And then last minute at the 25th hour, it turned out I didn’t get the job once that happened. It was so difficult to pick myself up off the mat and say, you got to keep going. And I think one of the things that did keep me going was I became so obsessed with the routine of it. You know, the routine of publishing a podcast and an article every day, Monday through Friday, because I have so many loyal people that have supported me on social media and fans of the podcast that write in and ask questions and retweet the podcast and all these things. It almost became like, I didn’t want to let those people down. And so I found strength and courage in my support system. If that makes sense like I was able to really make myself overcome this adversity based upon what other people had done for me. Like, does that make sense? I guess I’m trying to articulate as best I can.

Brett Dupree:

Yeah. That makes a lot of sense. Having a good support system comes up over and over on my podcast on how people keep ongoing. This is just one thing that’s curious for me as somebody who took a while, getting used to listening to his own voice, how did you get through that? Or did you always want to be an entertainer? How did you create your persona? What do you do to like pump yourself up editing? Which I hate, but I still do because how do you get through that?

Travis Wingfield:

The voice thing is funny. Like I still think my voice isn’t made for radio or podcasts, which I mean is hilarious to think about, but I pretty much didn’t listen to myself at first there for a while, but after a while it’s, I mean, it’s like anything else. I think once you do enough, you get used to it. As you know, Brett listened to the podcast regular basis, it is high octane. It is high energy. There are so many things I thought about when it came to being an on-air personality, which, you know, I guess that’s, that’s what I am. You know, this podcast was supposed to be X’s and O’s, and this kind of doldrums of here’s a big lesson, you know, it’s like a class. I can’t present that in the same tone, the same monotone and expect to have people want to come back because no matter how good the information is if you’re not entertaining, then what good does it do?

Travis Wingfield:

Like what you hear on the podcast is my personality. And I saw so many different ways that I guess you’re supposed to approach it. Like here’s how you’re supposed to act in this situation. Or here is how you can get more followers or more listeners by doing this thing. And there were so many avenues and detours where I’m thinking, okay, if I focus more on this, then I can grab that audience and bring them in. The more I did it. And the longer I did it, I realized if I’m not going to be genuine, if I’m not going to be myself, then there’s no way that this can ever be sustainable because then you’re just lying to yourself and you’re lying to your audience. And so I thought super energetic. I completely rely on the enthusiasm and I don’t really take criticism all that well or maybe negative feedback and all these things that I had to kind of do some, some introspective searching within myself to find out who I was and what it was that made me tick, made me really realize that if I’m not going to be myself on this podcast, it’s not going to work.

Travis Wingfield:

Everything you hear on locked on Dolphins. And now on the DriveTime podcast is genuine. Like that’s a hundred percent me. There’s absolutely fibbing, no filler. I might stretch the truth on a story or two, just to give it some more lifelike a comedian would write. But other than that, it’s the genuine article. I didn’t want to be this public-facing person. And I guess that’s kind of what the aim is to be in South Florida, at least locally, if I wasn’t going to be myself. And so that was, I guess, part of the entire introspective process was just be yourself, man, if they like you, they like you. If they don’t, then that’s fine too.

Brett Dupree:

Let’s get to the point where you start working for the Dolphins. Tell the story, how you got that job.

Travis Wingfield:

Yeah, it’s pretty crazy. So back in 2018, they, at least it became knowledge to me. I think it was the first year they did it. They used to have this thing called web weekend where they would invite different fan websites or I guess podcasts as it became more popular, different blogs and stuff like that to come down for a weekend, you got to like do a whole seminar and meet the other website guys and go to a game and cover a game in person there. They changed that a couple years back to where you could get two games per site according. Or like if depending on the website you could get two games and two tickets to each game to cover a game professionally. And so for someone that like you Brett grew up a diehard fan of the team to have the idea that I can go to a game and cover it from the press box and go into the locker room and ask at the time Adam Gase, Ryan Tannehill a question about the game.

Travis Wingfield:

It was pretty surreal. And so they invited me down, did two of those games made tons of connections. And that was very, very valuable as the networking and just people saying I’m a big fan of the podcast. It’s cool that they got you down here. And again, that positive reinforcement was just so, so beneficial to me. And then last year, 2019 did the same thing. And then the real big turning point for me in my career, Brett was last year’s training camp. I must have made the decision six or seven times back and forth that I was going and that I wasn’t going because I was going to flip my own airfare, my own lodging rental car, all these things that I had to do to get to South Florida from Washington state, mind you for 10, 12 days and go to practice every single day and cover these practices because the way I perceived it was I can bring to these training camp reports, which are, people, want them so much online on Twitter.

Travis Wingfield:

And I think I can bring what I do on the podcast and the website to these training camp. And so I’m going to take advantage of that. Really get my name out there, because this is when Dolphins fans, football fans are most intrigued right at the start of the season. Optimism is springing eternal, all that fun stuff. And so I thought let’s get down there, let’s cover it. And I finally made the decision, like I have to go it’s, I’m going to do it. If it sucks, it’s going to suck. If not great. I got down there and it’s really funny like here, this is kind of a tangent, but the first time I got down there, my wife and I booked the Airbnb for, let’s say July 25th. And I arrived on the night of July 24th, but it was past midnight. And so it was technically July 25th and I get to my room and it’s a hotel, but it’s an Airbnb within the hotel.

Travis Wingfield:

And I get to my room and it’s not cleaned. It’s not, it hasn’t been treated, and come to find out, I arrive one day too early. And I also found out that day that my, I was going to school at the same time I finished my four-year degree, actually just recently the person whose house I was staying in, when I would go to school, he backed out. And so like, I had all these things that were collapsing around and I thought, what another one of those moments, like, what am I doing? Why am I down here away from my wife watching these football practices? Like, what is this going to benefit me? And so I get down there and it’s a terrible start, but then the moment I get to practice the next morning, it’s just like, okay, this is what I was supposed to be doing.

Travis Wingfield:

So I go out there, I cover these 10 days worth of practice. And I actually got myself credentialed for the practices just by kind of getting my face there. And that got me access to players that got me so much notoriety on Twitter. I was gaining hundreds and hundreds of followers every day and podcast downloads and locked on Dolphins was the number one football podcast in the entire network. And it was just exploding in popularity. And I had sent an email earlier in the summer to one of the Dolphins, people that works in communications and said, Hey, like I see this not void, but this area of opportunity for the Dolphins to expand their media coverage internally. And I think that I could be a good asset for you. And I laid out all of these reasons and it just really approached it from the same way I approached my own podcast and my own website, just self-starter being persistent and really going after what you want a hundred miles an hour with no excuses.

Travis Wingfield:

And if I’m, if I’m going to chase this dream, I’m going to do it all the way. And if I fail, I fail. So that was my approach for that. Eventually, I get that email return. I get a phone call with someone that was important in the organization. When I come back to the games that I covered at the stadium and the press box, a few months later, I got a chance to meet some of these people that I was talking to. And then we came back down for another game in December later that year had breakfast with this very important person. And he sat down with me and said, so you ready to do this? Or what? And I was like, Oh, like, I didn’t know. This was the actual like interview or like accepting of the job, but back right around Christmas time December, I got that offer. And it’s been mind-blowing ever since.

Brett Dupree:

Yeah. Congratulations. I remember celebrating that on thephins.com. Thank you. So cool. What was it like that first interview with that first famous football player?

Travis Wingfield:

Well, luckily I had a chance to kind of warm-up to it at first, you know, cause being down there for practice and the games earlier, they actually got me an exclusive interview with Davon Godshaux my first day at practice. And that was, you can hear it when I would post the videos. Like if I would play the audio on the podcast, you could hear the stuttering of my questions or use kind of, that’s something that a new reporter will use kind of, you kind of had some, you know, good plays out there. You kind of did this and that. You can just tell how nervous I was at first. So, man, it took a long time. Like those first two games in 2018, the first game in the locker room, I was pretty standoffish. Wasn’t really aggressive and approaching interviews. The second game, the following Sunday, I was like, okay, I’ve been here.

Travis Wingfield:

I head in there and don’t chicken out basically. So I did that, but then we come back into 2019 and it’s the whole process had to start over again. So I was nervous, not really aggressive, but just like anything else you do, Amanda, the more you do it, the more comfortable you get, the more reps you get, it’s just become second nature. But that first one, it was nerve-wracking, especially when I got on the Dolphins network because I think it was Christian Wilkins. I told you I thrive on enthusiasm. Right? So he answers the phone. They were gone to this conference call and the online and he up and I’m like, Oh, there’s Christian Wilkins. That’s awesome. Like, I love that guy. And then he’s like, Hey, what’s up? And I’m like, Oh, he doesn’t want to be here. You know, you start all the self-doubt starts to creep in, but after like a question or two he’s as bubbly self once again and I’m Oh, I just was being too hard on myself.

Brett Dupree:

So this is something that I’d like to ask people. Who’s made it somewhere. How do you deal with the fraud phenomenon? That idea of like, do I really deserve to be here?

Travis Wingfield:

Oh, buddy, that is a can of worms. You mentioned like the football breakdowns told ya. I’m not a big guy whatsoever. Not a football player. I’ve played. I think the last time I played football was in the eighth grade. So there is this misconception by people that think that if you didn’t play the game to a certain point, you can’t possibly have knowledge of the game. And so you didn’t know it’s football is a complex game. You got 22 guys doing 22 jobs and moving in 22 directions. And so I watched these cut-ups. I’d had this idea in my mind that I knew what I was talking about. And I would watch somebody else who I know knows a lot more than I do do it. I’m like, man, am I an impostor here? Am I making any sense when I do these? So it’s something you think about all the time and I, maybe it’s just something that you become more and more comfortable with over time because it’s still there Brett.

Travis Wingfield:

Like I, I still think about it. Why am I the lucky one that gets to be in this position? And you know, why can’t they just pick someone else? I mean, I’ve thought about it, but I guess it’s just something you kind of try to put in the back of your mind because you can’t dwell on that kind of stuff because you know, being a public-facing figure like we mentioned, you’re going to get some feedback that you’re not going to like, and you’re going to get some people that tell you, you don’t know what you’re talking about. And if you let that really creep into your mind and kind of overwhelm you, then that’s what’s going to happen.

Brett Dupree:

So what’s been your favorite part about this job?

Travis Wingfield:

Definitely the access, the access to the team. And I’ll be able to expand on that probably more once we actually if you know, if we have football this year and if we when we finally get regular circumstances for media like I’m going to have an office inside the building where the Dolphins practice. Like if I told my 16-year-old self that I would be like, no, no, that’s, that’s not something that actually happens to people. You know? So I definitely just being around the team and being at practice every day and going to every game and team hotel, team charter, it’s just, it’s crazy to think about. And I still haven’t experienced all the way, so I don’t think I can properly appreciate it yet, but I plan to

Brett Dupree:

Awesome. Well, definitely should do something to celebrate you. It’s a great accomplishment. There’s a lot of people out there who want that in. You did it, man. That’s awesome.

Travis Wingfield:

It means a lot, especially from, you know, like I said, the support system, all the people that at thephins and finheaven that were, you know, always providing a platform for me to have these debates and to expand my knowledge. I mean, I talk about it on Twitter all the time. CKParrot, you know, Chris Kauffman he’s, you know who he is. I mean, the guy’s an absolute freaking whiz and he knows so much football. So to learn from guys like that and to just sharpen my writing skills, I mean, it wasn’t even the classroom, like it was a message board I would learn. And I would read off these people that did know more than I did, and I would learn how to write off that. And so it’s one of those things where, you know, the village raised you. So to speak,

Brett Dupree:

Yeah, standing on the shoulders of giants, we are coming towards the end of our time together. And one thing I like to ask my guests is do a one minute and motivation. You can imagine this is if you have a time machine and you’re traveling back to your eight-year-old self and you want to convey everything that eight-year-old self needs to know to live a happy joy-filled life. But unfortunately, you have a minute until you’re back into the future, or you can think of it as taking your life’s message and condensing it down to a minute. So are you ready?

Travis Wingfield:

Let’s go. Okay. So talking to my eight-year-old self, I would, I would definitely insist on pursuing passion and finding something that means more to you than anything else in terms of what makes you happy and be self-fulfilling in that way and do things that make you happy and put yourself first. Because if you don’t put the right emphasis on certain things you have to accomplish in your life, then you’re not going to be able to make those next steps. And then one day you might realize like I did that. You’re living a life that you don’t want to live. Every person I believe is capable of pursuing something that they have a talent in and achieving it. If they are willing to do what it takes to do that. I think that if we have to identify that and then we have to make a plan, establish it, put it in place, and then attack it relentlessly and be willing to work harder than everybody else. Be willing to put yourself out there and be willing to ask questions to people that you respect and have more knowledge of your field or of your study or whatever it might be. And just, I cannot put enough emphasis on relentlessly pursue your dreams and your hopes and your desires. And that’s true of all walks of life, whether it’s professionally or relationships and all these things you do just do it with passion, do it with excitement, be persistent, and love what you do.

Brett Dupree:

Awesome. Thank you so much for being on my podcast. I was super excited to have you on, as I followed your career since you were, I think 17 on a message board watching you grow through all these years has been a treat. So listening to your actual story has been awesome for me on how you were someone who started out as lazy. But finally, one day really started putting the work in once finding the passion and continuing to go through it, pushing through to a point of, and taking the big leap of going to down to Miami. When a lot of people probably wouldn’t do that, asking for that job for your position. If you don’t ask the answer is no. And you ask them the answer turned out to be yes, and now you’re on there and that’s just exciting to listen to. So thank you so much for sharing your inspirational story on my podcast and thank you for your amazing dolphin interviews.

Travis Wingfield:

Thanks for having me, Brett. I really appreciate it, man. Awesome. Mayor Davis special.

Inspirational Life Coach Brett Dupree (264 Posts)

Internationally certified life coach through inviteCHANGE, Brett Dupree envisions a powerful future in which people live in pure joy. He believes that there is a great transformation just around the corner and he coaches people on how to use passion and inspiration to ride the powerful wave of awakening that is sweeping this world. Brett has dedicated his life to the study of personal empowerment. He believes that real lasting change comes from changing from the inside out. Working with you one-on-one, Brett helps you listen to your inner voice to reach your goals with passion, inspiration and ease . He creates a sacred space that allows you clients to bask in the joy of creation. He will help you find peace and balance in their lives so you can transform yourself into a self leader. Using the power of intentions, the Law of Attraction and his deep loving powerful heart he helps his clients gain miraculous results.


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