Joyous Expansion Podcast Transcript Kat Kim – Utilizing the Shame of Past Mistakes to Fuel Your Burning Desires

Brett Dupree:

Hello Kat Kim, and welcome to my podcast.

Kat Kim:

Hi Brett. It’s so good to be here.

Brett Dupree:

It’s so awesome to have you here. I have known you for a while now as we both graduated from Invite Change and gradually a little bit for me. I remember watching your graduation little speech that you gave and thought, wow, this person is special.

Kat Kim:

Thank you so much. Yeah, it Invite Change for people who don’t know is the coaching training that we both came out of, but we’ve known each other for several for many years. Right, and we’ve been Facebook friends for a long time as well, so it’s really cool to be on this podcast with you.

Brett Dupree:

It is. I went, I’ve been to a couple of your life things that you’ve done, and it’s always been fun watching you grow through the last 10 11 years since I’ve known you.

Kat Kim:

Yeah, yeah. There’s been a lot of growth for sure.

Brett Dupree:

That’s the fun part about life.

Both:

Oh yeah. It can be fun. It can be hell. It’s necessary. That is so true. Yeah.

Brett Dupree:

Well, let’s start with the nitty-gritty here. You are a convicted drug offender and crack addict.

Kat Kim:

Oh Wow. You went straight for it, didn’t you? Yes, I am. That was, that’s part of the growth that I was talking about. That can be hell yeah. There’s quite a bit of story there.

Kat Kim:

As you know how I’m a spiritual teacher and I’ve found a school called the School of Divine Confidence and I help emerging leaders and spiritual seekers and changemakers step into the best version of themselves so that they can go out there, come out of hiding and go out there and make a difference in the world. I did not all start that way for sure. I mean, I don’t even know where to begin with my story, but I can, I can backtrack all the way to when I was a young child, which is pretty, it’s common, right? We take in as young children, we were just sponges for the information, the conversations that are going around in our environment, whether it’s within our family unit or at school or media. We just take that all in and we start, we start assimilating all of this into our minds and it becomes such a part of who we are and most of the time, well, I wouldn’t say most of the time, so much of the time it is not, it isn’t healthy, it isn’t the healthy stuff that’s going in.

Kat Kim:

A lot of it is really, really toxic, and unhealthy depending on your family environment. I grew up in a pretty toxic environment. My mother began feeding me diet pills when I was six years old. I don’t remember. I really don’t remember if it’s because she wanted me to lose weight and so she was feeding me these diet pills or if it was because I was asking her to help me lose weight because I remember I actually remember seeking my mom’s help, mom, can you help me lose weight? So I don’t know which came first, but I definitely remember feeling really unworthy. I felt ugly. I felt fat. I felt this incredible pressure and desire to change myself and conform so that I could be like everyone else. I definitely felt this incredible, this feeling that there was something fundamentally wrong with me and all of this starting in second grade, you know, and thus began a lifelong struggle of low self-confidence, low self-image, and really, really unhealthy body image issues.

Kat Kim:

And I grew up in an emotionally abusive and physically abusive environment. So I started rebelling at a very young age and I started smoking and drinking at 13 I started doing hardcore drugs at 16 and by the time I was 18 I was selling cocaine. I was dealing and I was transporting it from Washington state to California on the plane. This is before 9/11 so man, Brett, you, and not even, it was so easy. It’s ridiculous how easy it was. It’s pathetic actually. How easy it was. I put it in my purse, you know, I put it in my suitcase, barely hit it. Of course, things are much more, the security is way different after 9/11 but it wasn’t difficult. I went to, yeah, I was, I got caught. I was handcuffed, put behind bars and I was suddenly facing three years in state prison.

Kat Kim:

And you know what, even at that time though, I didn’t care. I didn’t care what happened to me. I had such low self-esteem or low self-respect and regard for myself that it didn’t even scare me. I was absolutely fearless, but it wasn’t the type of fearlessness that comes from courage, you know? It wasn’t the type that comes from a calling. It was just an absolute who is a dangerous type of self-loathing and self disrespect that comes from not giving a shit what happens to my life and my future and my body. There I was, and even while I was in jail, I was trying to make drug deals and I was trying to just take people down with me. I had, I wasn’t necessarily, my intention wasn’t to take people down with me. I never had, I’ve never had that type of intention. It was just that I didn’t care what happened to me. It was a very, very reckless, yeah.

Brett Dupree:

One thing I’ve heard on this podcast multiple times as a verbal abuse as a child, and I was wondering if you’re willing to elaborate on how that looks.

Kat Kim:

Gosh, the verbal abuse, I’m trying to think of very specific things. The verbal abuse came with physical abuse. You know, I was hit a lot. I was, you know like I said, I was fed diet pills. Oh, I do remember, you know, cause I was just six years old, I could barely reach over the counter and my mom would take the pills out and she would cut them in half. I was very curious. I was just thinking, I remember asking her, I was like, why are you cutting these in half? And she said, well these big ones are for adults and you’re only a child so you only need half of them. And I just, that I accepted what was going on in this exchange and this dynamic that I needed to be fixed as a child and I had to take pills.

Kat Kim:

I needed something outside of me to fix what was wrong with me on the inside. And this is what my mother, you know, this is something that my mother was telling me, whether it was indirect or direct, you know, and I think abuse comes in so many forms. There wasn’t so much a verbal, of course, there were, I guess it’s, you know, some times Brett, some of this stuff is so internalized that you don’t even know if it’s your parents saying them to you or if it’s just my own self. But definitely I was led to believe that there’s just something fundamentally wrong with me.

Brett Dupree:

So based on the actions of your parents, it almost created the verbal abuse inside your head.

Kat Kim:

Absolutely. Yeah, absolutely. That’s how, and you know, that’s, that’s how sensitive and prime our young minds are when we’re out in the world and we’re taking in all this information, there is a message that we’re receiving, even if it’s indirect.

Kat Kim:

And with everything that’s going out in the world right now and all the media and I, man, I have to say, I’m so glad I grew up in my era before all of this social media came out, I would have been caught. So I was already caught by the law, but it would’ve been so much worse if he always caught on Instagram stories or on a Facebook live doing half the stuff that I did. So I almost feel blessed that I grew up in the time that I grew up in and there’s no real physical evidence floating around on the interwebs. Of me making crazy mistakes what kids go through now, taking in all of that media and Snapchat and all of that is just insane. The types of messages that they’re taking in, especially in this culture. And this is kind of where I speak a lot about this.

Kat Kim:

You might’ve heard me talk about how we live in a consumer culture that really brainwashes us into believing that there’s again, that there’s something fundamentally wrong with us and that we need to conform and by something outside of us in order for us to be okay. So this struggle to, to reclaim your power and your confidence is really for me, in the work that I do, it’s about liberating ourselves from the demands of the consumer culture. First. We really have to become aware of it. And we have to be able to call it out when we see it. Otherwise, we’re constantly, it’s like the sea that we swim it. We can’t escape all of the media and all the advertising. There’s no way we can escape it, but we have to be hyper-vigilant and aware of how powerful it is and that it’s an every, you know, wait a minute though, I don’t do this anymore cause I stopped doing it, but even just a few months ago, the first thing I would do is pick up my cell phone when I wake up and I turn it on and I’m scrolling, I’m scrolling through the Inbox, I’m scrolling through Facebook and it’s like right at that moment, that precious moment between sleep and being awake when your subconscious mind is so open and receptive, what am I doing?

Kat Kim:

I’m picking up my phone and I’m feeding it all the ads that keep popping up all these offers and it’s just, wow. I was like, I need to stop that. I need to not let that be the first thing I do when I wake up. But we had to be aware. We have to be aware of it. We can’t escape it entirely, but we have to become aware of it if we want to find it.

Brett Dupree:

I think the funny thing is growing up, I always learned the AI was going to be the scary thing because it’s going to determine humans aren’t worthy and kill us all, but the reality is what AI does now is pretty much figure out how to sell us things in ways that are so crazy that once I woke up with my left shoulder hurting, I never talked about it, but for some reason, Facebook showed me an ad for a sling.

Kat Kim:

Oh yeah. Wow. Wow. That’s insane. It’s where we’re headed. It’s absolutely where we are headed and you know, Facebook itself has that. What did, oh, the name that they call it. It slips my mind right now. The funnel, you know when Echo Echo Chamber, right? We turn on Facebook and we scroll. This is not just Facebook, it’s when we go on Google, there’s an echo chamber wherein our own little bubble, and we, each of us has our, have created our own little reality depending on the things that we talk about and search. It’s dangerous if we’re not aware of this because then we become so closed off to the world outside of us and we become really focused on just our internal thoughts and our internal world and we become so disconnected with humans and other people and others parts of the world and how they think, you know? And we see that right now and with people just fighting all the time on social media or politics. Right. And it’s just a really sad, yeah.

Brett Dupree:

We actually have algorithms to change the headlines of stories based on your political views.

Kat Kim:

Wow. Wow. Absolutely. Yeah. Brett. And so these are the things that we have to become awakened to. I think you know, my work is primarily about helping people step into their calling and finding their confidence and reclaiming their power. Part of that for me, as I said earlier, is so much about being aware of what were the things that you’re talking about. We have to be aware of that because if we’re not there, we’re constantly thinking, what’s, what’s wrong with me? What’s wrong with me? Well, the thing is we’re being fed all the things that tell us what’s wrong with us, and so we have to liberate ourselves from that. I strongly believe that we have to really begin the journey of liberating ourselves from the demands of the consumer culture and whether that’s consuming products are that consuming media, whether that’s consuming information, it’s all-consuming.

Brett Dupree:

That makes sense to what you were saying earlier about being at a young age and wanting to fit in, especially at the age of around eight or nine is when we stop, start separating ourselves with our parents and start defining ourself from a peer group that people around us and wanting to fit in there.

Kat Kim:

Yep, absolutely. I think also being a person of color, you know, and I didn’t even realize this until just a couple of days ago as I was kind of reminding myself of my time when I was six or seven years old, I was surrounded by, I was like the only Asian girl in my class. Maybe there was another Asian girl. I distinctly remember thinking, I have to look like all my white friends without even knowing. Right. I wasn’t aware. I wasn’t even thinking that she’s white and I’m Asian. And it wasn’t even like that. It was just that there was something about them that felt right. And I had to learn how to be like that and that there was something wrong about me.

Brett Dupree:

Oh, I understand that as being, I mean, there weren’t very many well Mulatto kids growing up. And so I had that with the white kids and the group of black kids as well, that I was, no matter what, always different, always kind of on the outside and having to justify my amazing fro.

Kat Kim:

Yeah. Yeah. I totally relate to that. I completely, completely relate to that. Yeah. In fact. So yeah, I’ve always felt like an outsider, not quite this nor that, you know, I think there’s a part of me that’s just kind of naturally that way anyway. I think I was born into this world to be a bit of a nonconformist cause I just don’t really follow, I don’t like to follow the herd and wherever the herd is going, like, Eh, and I’ll go the opposite way sometimes is not necessarily a good thing. It’s just kind of a natural thing I do. But I realize that there are a lot of people who feel this way. I call myself a misfit, a nonconformist. And so a lot of the work that I do is really about helping people like you or me who’s never really felt like they fit in, who’s always felt like they’re an outsider. Those are the people that I really, really, really, really love working with and helping them to come out of hiding and step into, you know, they’re calling to make an impact in the world. That’s my favorite. I am such a champion for nonconformists and misfits.

Brett Dupree:

Well, that’s one thing I want to start with this podcast, and this is one reason why I like interviewing people. Awesome people like you is just having people like you tell their story and making people recognize, holy crap, I am not alone, because that’s where most of my life, that’s how I felt. I felt that was the only person going through this issue. The only person with extreme social anxiety, the only person that could be understood. If I had heard that I wasn’t the only one at the age of 15 that would have been amazing.

Kat Kim:

Yeah. Well, I think what you’re doing is really, really great. Absolutely. Yeah. Yeah. You know, it was, it’s crazy because people see me now and they think, I mean, when I tell my story about being a convicted drug offender, I would, when I was a crack addict, it was insane. You know, I was a social degenerate. I was homeless for a while. I went to jail. He was arrested in Oakland. It’s like notorious at that time for being one of the most dangerous cities in the United States, notorious for its high rates of homicides and violent crimes. That’s the type of experience I was attracting to myself because you know, that’s what happens with it. We bring into our life experiences that validate our internal beliefs to be true whether those beliefs are true or not because I thought I was unworthy because I thought I was that I didn’t matter.

Kat Kim:

I attracted everything into my life that validated those beliefs to be true. Whether it was being arrested or getting involved with it, relationships with men that were abusive or just doing, I mean, I’ve made so many mistakes. I’ve made so many mistakes and I that I had carried, I have carried a lot of shame around because I thought I was this person who was just bad. I was just a bad person, a bad little girl. That was the message I received and now that I talk about it, that was actually the verbal. I did receive the verbal like you are a bad girl, bad girl. You know, you are such a bad girl, you’re so you should feel lucky that you have a home and whatever. You know there was telling me that I’m a bad girl and there was a lot of guilt that was also tied in with that because I’m a bad girl and I have a home and I have all these things that I should feel lucky and you know all that stuff. You know the whole man, these beliefs, gosh, and for anyone who’s doing transformative work, these are the beliefs that we have to uncover because they control us. They’re deep in our unconscious mind and they dictate how we think and feel and how we behave, whether we were aware of it or not.

Brett Dupree:

That is so true. Awareness is always is the first step towards change.

Kat Kim:

Yeah, that’s what I say. Hey, absolutely. Awareness is always the first step to transformation. Always. No matter what.

Brett Dupree:

So one thing that just got me thinking is looking at you. The last thing I think is somebody who went through drug addiction. It’s not because of who you are is mostly because of the pictures that are put into my head through media of what a crack addict is.

Kat Kim:

Wow. That’s interesting that you say that. Yeah, and there’s a stigma, you know, and Gosh Man, I’m kind of just pausing because that’s such a big statement because again, it’s media putting out to us images of what a crack addict is or what a homeless person is or what a black person is or what an Asian person is or what a white man is. Do you know? Do you know what I mean? Like it’s this, it’s, it’s this, it’s this conditioning of visual images and words where we begin to take that in and just we create our reality with that when it’s completely, completely wrong in so many cases, I’m not saying it’s always wrong, you know, there’s some good media outlets who try to do their best in storytelling, but, and truth-telling you, man, this is really, there’s a lot of false narratives out there.

Brett Dupree:

It can be a really insidious number one time. I’m not proud of once I had this thought, but I remember getting into a bus and the bus driver was as gorgeous Asian woman, and my first thought you are way too attractive to be driving a bus.

Kat Kim:

Yeah. You know what Brett? So let me tell you, this is a story. It just popped into my mind. I had no intention of sharing this. But that’s an example of a type of racism where it’s like the model minority. Obviously I’m Asian and here’s, so let me just backtrack. Here is where I experienced racism on different, vary on different levels at the same time. So when I got arrested, I’m not even a go into all the crazy details. Just when I got arrested, I ended up on a shuttle bus. When I came off the airplane from Oakland Airport, I had my luggage with me. I got onto a shuttle bus and I was headed to my apartment and the shuttle bus driver was a brown man and he ended up dropping everybody off. Somehow I ended up being the last person to be dropped off and I was in the front seat and telling you as I said earlier, you attract people, experiences into your life that validate your beliefs to be true.

Kat Kim:

So somehow I started talking to this guy and we started talking about drugs. How crazy is that? You know, I just got off the plane and now we’re talking about illegal substances. And I said, Oh yeah, I have some. And he was like, really? And I was like, yeah, want some? So this guy pulls over the shuttle bus. It’s a commercial truck. It’s labeled as a shuttle bus, you know? And so he pulls it over into the Oakland hills. Apparently that’s where I was. And it’s dark, I think. Or it’s like dusk. It was not completely light. I just remember it starting to get dark and he pulls over and he was like, yeah, let’s do it. I said, okay. So I pulled some out and I gave him some, I didn’t do any, but he took a piece of paper and he started doing the cocaine thing, which is, I don’t want to get into those details, but he started snorting cocaine in the car behind the driver’s seat and all of a sudden, right when he was doing that, we saw a flashlight into the window and it was a cop and the cop was like knocking on the door.

Kat Kim:

He was like, what are you guys doing in there? And he threw the guy at the bus driver. He threw the coke into the middle of the, between my seat in his seat just in the middle there because you know what else is going to do it. So he just threw it down. And long story short, there were two cops that came. They ended up arresting the guy. Okay. He did get caught red-handed with the cocaine. But here’s what happened, which kind of was the beginning of just a weird, I don’t know. I, I learned a lot from this experience, not just at that moment, but years and years and years and years afterward. In hindsight, they arrested him, they let me go. They’re like, Hey, what are you doing? You know, you should be, you need to be careful. And I, they’re like here, just sit down here.

Kat Kim:

And I sat down on a rock and I was watching this whole thing unfold before me and I heard him, you know, read his Miranda rights to this guy and they arrested him. And I had cocaine in my purse. And so I was like, what am I gonna do? So I took it out from my purse without them seeing me and I threw it behind a rock that I was sitting on. And as this all was kind of unfolding, I had suddenly a really, really, really strong voice that came into my head. And I am a spiritual teacher now. But at that time, I didn’t believe in God. I had a really bad experience with God and church, so completely denounced it. And for many years after, I still didn’t believe in God. But at that moment I heard a voice and the words were, the truth will set you free.

Kat Kim:

And I was like, oh my God, are you serious right now? And it was so strong. And at that moment it was like, oh yeah, that was a voice from God. Even though I didn’t believe in God and all of a sudden in something completely took over me, I wasn’t even worried. I heard that voice, the truth will set you free. And then I also had this deep, deep sense of, and knowing that I was the one that was supposed to take ownership of this and that I was the one to go and that I would be okay. So I told the cops, officers, actually that cocaine is mine. And they were like, what? And they’re like, you should go, you should just please let him go, take me instead. And they were just like dumbfounded. They’re like, well, cause they had already booked him. They had already put him inside the car. And I was like, no, it really is mine. And I went behind the rock, I pulled out the stash and I threw back there and I was like, look, it’s mine. And then at that point, you know there.

Kat Kim:

So I was like, please release him, take me. And then the next set of events that happened, I just remember one of the cops taking him out and saying, I remember him saying, the cop saying to the guy, this is your lucky day. And then they let him go and he left. And then they had to deal with me. One of the cops who was a, he was another Asian man, but he was like, why are you doing this? And I said, it’s just, I don’t know, but it’s mine. It’s just my stuff. I have more in my suitcase. And he was like, wow, you know, I just, I actually just wanted to take you out for drinks or dinner. And I’m like, mmm, that’s nice. But I just remember that comment being made, this whole thing, I guess this all kind of relates to being a person of color.

Kat Kim:

Even though I’m a person of color, I was still treated better than black and brown people. Do you know what I mean? And so there’s these layers and layers of just kind of racism and experiences of racism that had been both positive but also being a model minority. It’s like, ah, it’s better, you know? But it all kind of also ties into not being white, nor I’m not black, obviously, it’s, and in the conversation that’s happening around race today and on most days it’s about black and white. And so it’s this another experience of how do I fit into this? I don’t really fit in as another experience of feeling kind of like an outsider. And so again, still trying to find my way as a minority who’s a model minority or I mean not a model, not black nor white, you know. Anyway, I mean, long story, I kind of went off on a tangent there, but I ended up going to jail. That’s how he got caught. I kind of turned myself in.

Brett Dupree:

Oh Wow. So that’s very interesting. It’s one thing that has come over my podcast, uh, multiple times is almost as divine guidance and it was almost like divine guidance was that this is your point to turn it around this, this is where I’m going to come through.

Kat Kim:

I love that. That’s exactly what it was for sure.

Brett Dupree:

So after you got caught, how did you start taking your past experiences into becoming the founder of the School of the Divine Confidence?

Kat Kim:

That’s a journey of course, and I’m still on that journey, but essentially I had to get really clear about who I was being called to be as a woman. That wasn’t even my wake up call, by the way, going to jail wasn’t my wake up call. My wake up call happened many, many, many, many years after I had, you know, I went to jail, I cleaned up. I still was carrying those deep, deep thoughts and feelings of not being good enough. So even though I stopped doing drugs, I was still getting involved in attracting toxic, abusive men into my life. I was depressed, I was still not talking to anybody. And it wasn’t until I was walking down my hallway, this is now many years after going to jail and I was going to my elevator and there was, there’s this mirror, this big huge mirror that was on the wall across the elevator door.

Kat Kim:

And as I walked to the elevator door, I caught a glimpse of someone. She was standing there and she was really frumpy. Her hair was disheveled and she had, her face was like so puffy and swollen and it looked like she had some sort of rash or assisting acne or something. And it was more than just how she looked though there was this really deep depressing energy that was coming from her. And at that moment, even though I was just wallowing in my own toxicity and depression and self-hate, I saw her and I was like, oh my God, at least I’m not that bad. And then it hit me like a ton of bricks that I was actually looking at myself in the mirror.

Brett Dupree:

Oh Wow.

Kat Kim:

Yeah. I had become so disconnected with the woman that I know in my heart that I was being called to be. And the person that I was actually showing up as those two is so disconnected that I didn’t even recognize myself in the mirror and I saw myself. That was my turning point. That’s when I decided I would do whatever it takes to become the woman that I wanted to be. I wanted to walk into a room and have people notice me, not for how I looked, but for my substance in for my character, I wanted to make an impact and do important things and transform lives. That was my secret burning desire, so this is one of the key things for people who just know in their bones. They have a secret burning desire and it’s a secret because they feel at that moment that it’s something they can’t do. It’s so out of their league, that it’s like they don’t share it with anybody because it’s such a vulnerable thing to share because you know because we think people are going to laugh at us.

Kat Kim:

Right. That was what I wanted so badly. I decided at that moment I would do whatever it takes to become that person. I became a professional image consultant, not because I wanted to be an image consultant, but I really immersed myself in the studies of body image and style and color and how to transform our appearance in a way that matches who we are on the inside. And then then I became a nationally certified personal trainer where I began studying what the physical body goes through to undergo a transformation. I lost a bunch of weight. I began taking care of myself and showing up in a different way, dressing differently. That really matched more of who I knew I was on the inside and I became a transformative life coach through the same training that you went to, you know, where we are on studying the mindset and how our thoughts and our feelings all impact our behaviors.

Kat Kim:

Right? And my quest for transformation on the outside, kept on taking me deeper and deeper inside and I began studying spirituality and metaphysics and consciousness and energy and you know, I became a licensed spiritual practitioner. I’m currently one foot in the ministerial path, you know, we’ll see how far that goes. But I do feel like I’m being called to share what I have learned about spirituality and power that is innately within each and every one of us, and so that’s why I combined all of these, my backgrounds and my experiences overcoming addiction and abuse and body image and bullying and depression. That’s how I started the school of divine confidence because I wanted to help people just like myself who’ve never felt like they fit in, but they know in their bones that they’re here to do something important. I want them to be able to step into that power and answer that call.

Brett Dupree:

What do you love most about this being a co-founder of the School of Divine Confidence?

Kat Kim:

Just what I said here is that I get to see people, one of my clients said this about me a long time ago and it’s kind of stuck with me, so you know Professor X in Wolverines, excellent. Sorry, x men. He said that I am like Professor X and I was like, oh my God, yes, I have this school. I work with mutants, people who never really fit into society. In this way or that way. They always felt like an outcast. I really do have a gift of being able to pinpoint those people and draw out their natural strength and their skills and their abilities, even though they feel like there’s something wrong with them. I’m really good at teaching them and showing them how everything that they think is wrong with them is, is exactly what they need to fuel their secret burning desire to step out and do their thing in the world. Because that’s what I did. Right? I feel like that’s what I love the most, is seeing that moment where they’re, oh my God, I can, I can do it. I have that power.

Brett Dupree:

Do they also have cool nicknames?

Kat Kim:

I should. We should do that.

Brett Dupree:

So we’re coming to the end of our interview together. And one thing I love to ask my interviewees is for one minute of motivation, you think of this as if you have a time machine and travel back to your eight-year-old self, but you only have one minute to convey a message to change your life forever or just condense your life purpose message down to a minute.

Kat Kim:

Oh, dear. Okay, well I know that even though you feel pain, even though you feel shame, even though you feel regret for making mistakes or for not doing the thing that you think you should be doing, I know with 100% certainty that all of those things that you feel pain and shame about, those are actually going to fuel you. They are purposeful and they are divine and all of those things are going to point you in the right direction of your true calling and I know with 100% certainty that when you step into your divine calling that you become the answer to someone’s prayer.

Brett Dupree:

That is so beautiful. Thank you, Kim, for coming to my podcast. It has been an honor for me to have you on here listening to your story of how you went through such harrowing experiences of something that this square can’t understand, to being able to transform that into helping people reach their full potential in ways that they probably can’t even imagine. I find it extremely inspiring. So thank you so much for sharing your story with us as well as your service to making this world a better place.

Kat Kim:

Oh, you are so welcome Brett. I’m so, I’d loved our time together and I also just wanted to mention that one of the things that have helped me is I discovered a really easy one question that helps me move through these moments and I actually created an audio training, a free audio training. Can I share it with you guys cause I would love you guys to be able to get access to this if you want? It’s called from shame to confidence, how to reclaim your personal power with one magical question and I kid you not. This question for me has been the thing that has helped me to overcome the shame and the guilt that I feel around topics like being a convicted drug offender or getting an abortion or making financial mistakes. I have made so many mistakes but I have found that they really are purposeful and there’s a way to use those experiences to drive you into stepping into your true callings. I created this free audio training. It’s for half an hour and you can get access to that at www.KatKim.com/ShameToConfidence. And it’s one word, shame to confidence.

Brett Dupree:

I’m sure that will help people. So thank you for coming on.

Kat Kim:

Thank you, Brett. I’ll see you soon.

Joyous Expansion Podcast Transcript Jill Celeste – Embrace Your Role as Director of Marketing

Brett Dupree:

Hello, Jill. Celeste, welcome to my podcast.

Jill Celeste:

Well, thank you for having me, Brett Dupree. It’s good to be here.

Brett Dupree:

Ah, yeah, it’s nice to see you again, I guess, or hear you again. So it says here that you are a founder of the celestial circle and an entrepreneurial cheerleader.

Jill Celeste:

Yes.

Brett Dupree:

How’d you get into that?

Jill Celeste:

So I started being an entrepreneur back in 2010 I opened a social media marketing agency back then, but I learned quite quickly that I’m not the one you want implementing your social media. I wasn’t in my unique brilliance and what I really love to do was coach marketing. But in 2013 I started my coaching business, which has evolved in ebbs and flows, right? Like businesses do now. Fast forward to today, I am still teaching marketing. But what I have found is that people and entrepreneurs, in particular, they need someone to be a cheerleader for them, like to root them on and say, I believe in you because it’s such a lonely job sometimes. And so that’s a lot of what I do in my coaching practice

Brett Dupree:

early on. Did you find your entrepreneurial path to be lonely?

Jill Celeste:

It did. You know, I mean, uh, at the time I was the only one in my family. He was an entrepreneur. I didn’t have any entrepreneurial friends. I still had work colleagues. I really think everybody at first thought I was crazy for opening a business. And so I really didn’t have anybody to talk to, to share frustrations or disappointments or just even kind of ask questions. I felt very alone and I just kind of sat in a little office with my dog and I worked. It wasn’t until a couple of years later when I joined a mastermind that I realized that I was missing that piece for my business.

Brett Dupree:

So what got you started into wanting to go into social media marketing?

Jill Celeste:

Well, back then in 2010 social media marketing was sort of a new thing, and I was a social media manager at the job I had in a large healthcare organization. And as I was paying an invoice to another agency for thousands of dollars, I thought, you know, I could do this. And it really just has stuck a little bug in my ear and I started to investigate it. And once that idea set roots, I was able to quit my job in four months I was, I brought that business up on the side, just happened to hit that social media wave at the right time and it was very blessed to be able to do it full time within four months of opening the doors.

Brett Dupree:

Wow. That is a lot of success right away. Way to go.

Jill Celeste:

Yeah. Thank you. Thank you. And I attribute a lot of it to my tenacity, my determination, some really good timing as well. Some good luck I think, but really, really working backward and knowing, okay, I need to make this much money. I need to be able to compensate for this and all of these different ducks in a row and be able to reverse engineer that process and I was able to do it.

Brett Dupree:

So as you’re working through social media marketing, you came to a point where you just noticed that this wasn’t my area of brilliance.

Jill Celeste:

The actual implementation was, I can do it. I was okay on it and no one complained about what I offered, but it didn’t make my heart sing. But what was my heart sing was when I get on the phone, my client and I teach them marketing. Cause I had been a marketing professional for years in corporate and I would teach them what I know and that really felt so good. And so finally, after doing it for a couple of years and having a very successful job with it, I decided that open up a coaching arm of my business. And from there I just took off.

Brett Dupree:

Did you have any fears or anxieties about starting actually a coaching business?

Jill Celeste:

Oh, I was so yes, yes. Thousand times. Yes. It’s, it’s a different thing when you’re coaching and teaching, in my opinion. And you probably know this too from your business, it’s, you know, you don’t want to do someone wrong. You don’t want to give bad advice, you know, you feel like that person’s really depending on you too, especially when you’re marketing coach to really teach them how to market their businesses so that they can become a success. Like a lot of pressure, Everly self-imposed pressure. And that caused me a lot of anxiety for sure.

Brett Dupree:

How did you deal with that anxiety?

Jill Celeste:

Xanax. Just kidding. Well, you know, it’s interesting when I reflect back on it, the more I did it, the less more confident I got. So that increase decreased my anxiety, right? I was able to become more confident in my ways and in my teaching I worked on my mindset a lot, you know, a lot of research, a lot of work in what mindset and different types of new-age theories and things. I was trying to kind of find, finding my way, but just realizing that I needed to have my self worth in order and my self-confidence in order and that nothing bad was really going to happen to me. And by just staying very present and not focusing on the past in the future, but to staying really in the present helped me. I wasn’t completely, completely anxiety-free, but it helped me, uh, dissipate it to enough where I could overcome it enough to go forward. It didn’t paralyze me like it wanted to.

Brett Dupree:

What about being in the presence present helped you to reduce your anxiety?

Jill Celeste:

Well, as, as somebody who follows mindfulness, you know, there’s really no past, there’s really no future. These are, these are concoctions of our mind. But at present it’s just what’s in front of you. And if you just take an inventory of your present moment and everybody’s alive and around you and breathing and the house is standing and the weather’s up there and you have money in the bank and like you just take a snapshot of your present life, did you find that there’s really nothing to fear? Nothing to hold you back. So that mindfulness by staying in the present reminded me that if I was anxious about something, that I was worried about the future not and which I had no control of. And it may not even turn out that way. So by cutting that line of thought off and by to staying mindful and in the present, it really dissipated any anxiety I was feeling

Brett Dupree:

Cool. And also a lot of times about the past as well.

Jill Celeste:

Correct? Right. I find the past was made to cause more depression than anxiety, at least for me. If I were to dwell on something or whatever, even in from a business perspective, like really getting hung up on past failure. For example, I wouldn’t say it like clinical depression but make you sad or just kind of take out the four techs happy half have your happy spot and that wasn’t good either.

Brett Dupree:

Did you have incidents such as where it’s something you really wanted to work in, it just did not work out the way you wanted to, where you then use this mindful presence to take you out of it?

Jill Celeste:

Yeah, so there were times certain clients would hire me to do, to be like their marketing manager, like in a fractional CMO or director of marketing. There was a particular client that I really wanted to do a good job for whatever reason. It just wasn’t, it wasn’t happening and it was, it was on both sides. I started to feel anxious about my reputation and about my confidence and I just really worked on staying present, did a lot of meditation. I remember meditating a lot before bed. I would listen to some guided meditation on from my phone journaling to kind of get me through that and eventually, we mutually agreed to break up, I guess for lack of better terms and it was so peaceful for both of us. It was an amicable break. We still in touch with each other so that you know, that shows that there wasn’t any animosity, but they’re really tapping into those basic mindfulness exercises really helped me through that period.

Brett Dupree:

What do you find the hardest part about being an entrepreneur?

Jill Celeste:

Well, I’m a naturally impatient person. Things don’t happen as fast as I would like and I have found through my eight-plus years as an entrepreneur that that’s normal, that you have to be patient. In fact, I didn’t. I now say that patience is the most important virtue of an entrepreneur because we often, have an eternal timetable that we want to meet and sometimes we cannot meet those timetables. That’s just the way it is. And often we don’t give ourselves enough time. For example, for marketing. We don’t give ourselves enough time to market our business. We don’t give ourselves enough time for our marketing to work. We don’t give ourselves enough time for clients to convert. We become impatient because we want to be a success that doesn’t always work out in the timetable we’ve chosen for ourselves. So patience is definitely something, I have learned and instill learning. I’m here on my entrepreneurial journey.

Brett Dupree:

Yeah. That reminds me of a saying that one of my mentors keeps on saying, telling me the Fortunes in the followup.

Jill Celeste:

Yes, that’s for sure. That’s for sure. Because people, we forget, you know, like from a sales perspective that we often need to reach out to somebody. What is it? You know, what does the average, now he was seven to nine. I think it might even be longer now time. So for someone who decides to buy, well that’s an active patient, right? Maybe we’ll give up before they finally agree to purchase from you. So just even that following up requires a lot of patients.

Brett Dupree:

So I’m just feeling like a dummy right now because I just noticed that you’re the founder of the celestial circle and your last name’s Celeste

Jill Celeste:

[Laughter]. You’re no dummy. I got, I got very, very lucky in many ways. When I got married, I got a great guy and a great last name. I do play off my last name quite a bit in all of my branding. How I sort of see myself is if you remember back in olden days when sailors used to sail and they relied on the stars for navigation, I coined myself mostly internally, but I coined myself as sort of that North star and the leading the entrepreneurs on their entrepreneurial journey. That seed marketing. I keep that as a remembering of why I do things and that really helps me stay focused, but that’s sort of the play of the word celestial that I use.

Brett Dupree:

As a member of this last, you’ll circle and been paying attention to you for the last couple of years. You’ve really upped your video game lately.

Jill Celeste:

Yes. Thank you for noticing.

Brett Dupree:

Were there any anxieties about putting yourself out there? Especially doing like Facebook lives and more videos and stuff like that.

Jill Celeste:

Well, it’s interesting. My video marketing journey has been quite long. I’ve actually been, I started doing videos I got three years ago, I would do a weekly video and I still do a weekly video for my blog. So there was a lot of anxiety, not about being on camera per se, but about the technology. How, how’s this gonna work? How can I edit it? Like all those things cause they’re not in my unique brilliance. And finally, I decided, who cares? Just shoot the video, be imperfect. And I’ve been doing that ever since. When the live streaming features came on, I had a lot of resistance because with live streaming there’s no, Oh crap. Let me just rerecord that. There is none of that. You’re going right off the cuff. So as someone who likes to come across very eloquently and very prepared, I really had to up my game on imperfection with doing live streams and I’m really comfortable now.

Jill Celeste:

I’ve, I’ve accepted that it will never be perfect. And there’ll be ums and ahs. Sorry, Toastmaster, Brett oohs, and aahs in that process. And that’s okay. People are understanding. I think people like that. They don’t like anything slick, so that really helps. But again, as I mentioned before was about practicing and just doing it and being imperfect and that really alleviated a lot of the anxieties that I experienced at first. And I teach that to my students, new students now that really it’s okay to be imperfect on video. People expect it to be not slick and polished unless it’s, you know unless it’s a highly produced video, but that’s not what we’re expecting on Facebook live and in live streams. And that really helps people overcome that anxiety of being on camera.

Brett Dupree:

You keep on mentioning about letting go of being perfect. Did you have a big problem with that at first?

Jill Celeste:

Yeah. Because you know you always want your best foot forward, right? I believe that your reputation, it helps you attract the right people. I have a bit of a, what I call personal branding background, where you brand your first and last name, your person as the expert, and say you want to come off, well, right? You want to come off as somebody who knows her stuff. And I was translating that into perfect marketing copy, perfect videos, perfect Facebook posts, perfect graphics, and that’s not really the right way to interpret it, but that that’s what I was doing at the time. What I learned is that perfection often means you don’t implement anything because you’re always trying to obtain this perfection, which doesn’t even exist. Right? What was happening is there was like that analysis process and nothing was getting done. So by being imperfect, you will get more things out there, you’ll get more marketing tests done. And I think as a nice, lovely by-product is that people will see you and will resonate with you and that will result in you more clients.

Brett Dupree:

The other thing I keep hearing you say over and over again is the term unique brilliance.

Jill Celeste:

Hmm. Yeah. So what I mean by that is each of us is wired to have certain gifts. Some of us are fabulous writers, some of us are fabulous orator, some of us are gifted artists. Some of us can put together a computer. Well, others of us could not. You know, we all have the things that we’re uniquely gifted with. Things that did makeup you, Brett, Jill, whoever. And our jobs as entrepreneurs is to eventually, we can’t always do this at first, but to eventually only do those things that are in our unique brilliance and the things that are not in our unique brilliance and things that we struggle with that take us a long time to finish. Somebody else would do that for us. Somebody else who’s uniquely brilliant in that particular task. So for example, you might do a podcast and you might be a really good interviewer, but the idea of editing that audio, you can do it, but um, it would be faster. Somebody else did, right? So that means that you would offload that. You would outsource that to somebody. So that’s what I mean by unique brilliance is you want to be doing what is innately what you’re innately good at, what you would do for free all the time because it’s something that you love to do and are passionate about it, and then eventually offload or outsource have a team to help you do the rest of it that isn’t in your wheelhouse, so to speak.

Brett Dupree:

How do you give up that desire to control everything?

Jill Celeste:

Well, I’ll let you know when I figured it out. No, I think we’re all kind of control freak, especially entrepreneurs. This is our, these are our babies, our children, whatever analogy you want to use there and we, so we aren’t going to be controlling, but I think a lot of it is again, that anxiety because that’s really what control is, is a fear of something not going right. A fear of something not being done, being anxious about things being done your way. And so when you relieve some of that anxiety and realize that there are people who can do things better than you and that you’re not at the end all that beat all, then that really helps release some of that control. But my goodness is not an overnight process at all.

Brett Dupree:

So thinking back about your entrepreneurial path, is there, what is the one thing that you did that you feel is been the most important to making Jill Celeste, The Celestial Circle?

Jill Celeste:

The most important thing I did was join a mastermind for sure, by being part of a group, having a mentor, change my business. I not only did I have a group of people too who are entrepreneurs who, who got what my problems were, who understood my journey because they were on it too. But I also had a mentor to help me answer your questions. And you know, normally people kind of look at you sideways when you’re a marketing coach, hiring a marketing and business mentor, like, you know, don’t you know this stuff already? Of course, I do. But it’s not that, that’s not what I’m there for. It’s for the accountability and the support and the structure that a good mastermind will offer you. So I always invested in some type of mentorship and or mastermind with like-minded entrepreneurs. And that also beats that loneliness thing I mentioned earlier in the interview. Right. That is for sure. Something I always will have in my business no matter what.

Brett Dupree:

Isn’t it funny how people do that thought process of if you’re a blank, why do you have a blank yourself?

Jill Celeste:

Yes. Isn’t that true? Am I thinking, you know, Celine Dion had a great vocal coaching people who are NFL quarterbacks have coaches. You know, it’s, it’s, I don’t know what, what that is. I don’t know if it’s an ego thing or just a way of processing their own mindset issues, but I have heard that many times in my career.

Brett Dupree:

I think part of that comes from this idea of the lone ranger, the self-made person pulling yourself up by your bootstraps and all that.

Jill Celeste:

Yeah. You know, I think you’re right. And that’s a certainty, I know that’s very prevalent in the US as well, right? That kind of self may, cowboy kind of image, cowgirl image. We pulled ourselves up from their bootstraps. I think maybe even a cultural ramification, not just maybe exclusive to the US but that’s got me thinking like that as well. I think you’re onto something there.

Brett Dupree:

I know for myself the more help that I get, the better my business goes, well better my life goes period.

Jill Celeste:

Absolutely. And even like for those of us who manage our home, you know, I’m, I’m married, I’ve got a couple of boys, teenagers and anything I can have done in my house that other service provider can provide, I do it. I’m very blessed to be able to afford it. I know that might be some consideration for some people, but I have people clean the house, do the lawn, manage the pool. Cause I live in Florida so we have a pool and know we still have chores and things around the house, but just anybody, anything I can do that is not something I am wanting to do that keeps me in a good mindset. Somebody else does it for me. I’m happy to write that check every single time.

Brett Dupree:

And that frees you up to do things that you love.

Jill Celeste:

Exactly. Exactly. That’s exactly what it is. And the same with your business, right? Because I’m not, you know, I’m not great at Infusion Soft, which is the software I use to manage my customers. So I have a wonderful VA who does that, loves it, eats, breathes, sleeps, infusion soft, and she does everything. Probably in record time. If I were to do it, it would take me an hour to do something that would take her two minutes. So God bless her, let her do it.

Brett Dupree:

[laughter] so it says here that you help authentic marketing teaches authentic marketing fundamentals. What is important about being authentic?

Jill Celeste:

Well, so I think a lot of people, a lot of entrepreneurs especially think marketing is slick in an inauthentic, icky, yucky, whatever word you want to put there. And we’ve, cause we’ve seen examples of it, you know, you can scroll down a Facebook newsfeed for example, and see headlines that are very clickbait ish, make $10,000 this month or fast forward to six figures or blah, blah, blah. And people are very suspicious of those claims, understandably so. And it leaves a bad taste in their mouth. And so when you’re an entrepreneur and you have that mindset that marketing is the key, sales is icky, then you don’t feel too enthused about doing your own marketing right? But there are ways to do marketing that don’t have to feel icky and slick and just generally ucky you can learn authentic marketing practices, which is what I teach. So things like you don’t know who your ideal client is, so you’re only talking to people that audience, you’re not trying to cast your net too wide because that leads to enough in being inauthentic, you know, making sure that you’re writing a piece of truthful information in your landing pages and in your emails that you’re showing your personal side.

Jill Celeste:

That’s a lot of authenticities right there. When people see that you’re real life, that leads to an authentic connection as well. So those are the types of things I teach the authentic marketing that doesn’t make someone feel icky when they’re implementing it.

Brett Dupree:

And what’s the benefit of a showing of the authenticity side?

Jill Celeste:

The benefit is showing the authenticity side is that people are cut by from a person, not a business. So if they get an idea of who you are, that whole know like trust factors, what is often the big battle in our marketing, we want people to know us, they want, we want them to like us and they want us, we want to be trustworthy because when those three things occur, we often will be able to serve that person. They’ll be able to hire us. So the authentic marketing brings you through that know like trust factor often quite more quickly than other marketing methods so that you can connect with people so people will feel connected to you. And when that connections occur, that is when you make the sales, that’s when you get the clients, that’s when you get the referrals. It’s really that sweet spot in your marketing. It doesn’t happen overnight for sure, but it does happen faster than if you’re trying to do something that feels out of integrity and out of alignment with yourself.

Brett Dupree:

Looking over your bio, one thing I really enjoy is the idea that you said the role as director of marketing for their business.

Jill Celeste:

Yeah, that’s so true because a lot of times we say, Oh, I’m a massage therapist or I’m a marketing coach, or I’m a graphic designer, or I’m a life coach, but what we, and we are those things, we are certain our trade or jewel or profession, but w we are on me or solo preneur at least until you reach big time is you are the director of marketing for your business. What that means is everything you do in your business, I think marketing comes across your desk, you’re in charge of it and a lot of times entrepreneurs do is they forget that and they focus on other things. While those other things don’t bring your clients. I want to have a conversation with a woman. I said, you know, you’re the director of marketing for your business. You have to find time for marketing. She said, well, I don’t have time for marketing.

Jill Celeste:

I said, okay, I get it. What? Tell me what you’re doing in your day. And the first thing out of her mouth was like, well, I have to empty the trash bin. Well I, and I wasn’t picking on her, but it was a mindset. I’m like, you are placing, emptying the trash bin before marketing and you wonder you got no clients. You know, it’s a mindset shift. That’s the last thing you should be doing after you’re doing your marketing. So when you’re the director of marketing for your business, you put marketing tasks first. You make time for marketing. It is the most essential thing you do in your business besides taking care of your clients. And you have a marketing plan to help you guide your marketing actions so that you’re not feeling like you’re just picking marketing tasks at the sky. And so when you, when you accept your role as director of marketing, these habits become part of your day. And that’s when you really start to see the results of your marketing efforts. That’s where the clients come, the revenue, the referrals, all those things that we’re seeking.

Brett Dupree:

But I also liked the director part for when you actually do start making money, you start getting other people to help to do it for you.

Jill Celeste:

Exactly. And eventually, if you, when you are super successful, then you can have a director of marketing come in, and then you just become like the chief marketing officer where you overseeing everything. But you don’t necessarily do the marketing work unless that’s in your wheelhouse. Of course. I don’t know if I’d ever personally get rid of marketing my business completely because I’m a marketer or for some people who, you know, that’s not 100% in their wheelhouse. So having that person on their team would helpful. But again, that’s, you know, when you, when you hit six figures, that’s when you start looking at that kind of addition to your team.

Brett Dupree:

So do you have a success story from a client to share?

Jill Celeste:

Oh my goodness, I have so many. I am so lucky to be working with a lot of people over the years. I think one of the most many fun people that have gotten to work with, but one in particular that I’m serving now through the celestial circle is a girl, I won’t mention any names, but is a, is a person who was trained as a doula.

Jill Celeste:

So a doula is a person who assists mothers with birth. They’re sort of an advocate for the mom and the baby. She had been a very successful doula practice. But with, the thing about being a doula is that your schedule is not your own because babies come when babies come, right. They don’t on anyone’s schedule unless you’re being induced or something. And so she was, it was taxing for her. She’s a mom, married, et cetera. So she decided that she wanted to still have a doula business, but she wanted other doulas to come under her umbrella and she was terrified because she had her way. She hasn’t had an excellent reputation as a doula. And one of the things done her way. Right. That’s, that’s, that’s so common with entrepreneurs. But she, you know, she, so she just started finding doulas is training them in her methodology and her practice.

Jill Celeste:

And before you know it, she had a couple of doulas under her belt and now she’s at the luxury where if she wants to be at that birth, she absolutely can. But she doesn’t have to be because she’s got a team of experienced loving doulas who will go to the birth on behalf of the company and she’s returned my time back to her schedule. So now she’s doing other things to grow a business such as coaching. She just had her second six-figure, a five-figure month ever by leveraging this. And so I’m just, it’s fun because you know, she went from living by the cell phone ringing and running to the hospital’s birthing center. To just saying, you know, so and so you go take care of this patient or you sound so you could take care of this mom. And she just sits back and does other things while still loving these families.

Jill Celeste:

So that was, that’s a cool thing and I’m very proud of her.

Brett Dupree:

So how did your process help or accomplishing that?

Jill Celeste:

Well, the first thing, you know, again, a lot of that was an operational piece, which operations do play into marketing. But first and foremost you have to hit the mindset right, that she can absolutely teach her methodology. So one of the things we worked on was what her methodology was. What I mean by that is the step by step process that she has that sort of proprietary to her. And then talking about writing job descriptions, making sure that she had everything she needed to find the right doulas. That’s the first thing. And then we switched to the marketing because what was with her is she was marketing. She was known by her first and last name, right? That was how it worked. We had to switch to the lesson, a personality-based business, a more process-based business.

Jill Celeste:

So in our marketing, we tackled that maybe Nicole is not in the labor and delivery room with you. And so we talked about the marketing messaging and how that helps the moms, that sense of security that they feel by knowing somebody was under Nicole’s mentorship, that type of thing. So it was many facets. It was a many-faceted process from the operation side as well as marketing. It was a lot of fun to work on working on her mindset, giving her the bravery and the self-worth and the self-confidence to go down that path. That’s a big scary path to go down. You do it in baby steps though, you know, not everything’s done. You can’t just flip a switch. It’s a baby step process and that’s what we’ve worked on a lot together.

Brett Dupree:

Oh, how so many people sell that switch?

Jill Celeste:

No, the switch does not exist. Sorry. Hate to break it to everybody. It’s, that’s the click baby inauthentic thing. That’s what people are so turned off by is that that is that kind of claim

Brett Dupree:

and it’s very easy to get suckered into it sometimes, especially when you were filling out desperate and like, ah, I just want to turn everything around.

Jill Celeste:

Yeah. And I think that’s, that’s why I get so aggravated with fellow marketing and business coaches and maybe they get aggravated at me, but I’m like still promising the sky, this market marketing and running your business is hard work. It takes time. It takes elbow grease, it takes patience. There’s no such thing as an overnight get the rich formula. It’s just snake oil at that point. You have to do the work and you have to do the time and that that’s where you get the results. I wish there was a magic pill because I would take it.

Brett Dupree:

So we’re getting to the end of our time. And one thing that I love to ask my guests to give is one minute of motivation. Kind of reducing your message into one minute or thinking of it as you have a time machine and you get to go back to your eight-year-old self, then you have eight minutes to give yourself all the juicy details you need to set yourself up for success.

Jill Celeste:

Hmm. So I got a minute to do that. Right? Okay. So the first thing I would say is you are worthy of everything that you want in your life. Don’t let anybody tell you any differently because you know what you’re worth. And depending on your religious and spiritual beliefs, the universe, God, Buddha, whoever knows your worth as well. And so always lean into that, especially during times when it feels like others are against you or telling you that that can’t happen. So that would be my first motivational moment there leading into the following thing, which is you are enough, you are capable, and you can do anything. You set your mind to be confident. Surround yourself with people who will lift and support you. And if they don’t, then lovingly release them from your life because they will just suck you down into a dream that you don’t want to go down. And that would be that. That would be my piece there.

Brett Dupree:

Nice. Well, thank you, Jill, for being on my podcast. I love your message of authentic marketing and how-to because for my people buy from people instead of buying from businesses and the most, the more you can help people market themselves, the more people can get themselves out there. Because if you are a purpose-based entrepreneur with the idea of making the world a better place, if nobody knows about it while the world’s not going to get any better. So helping people to share their light upon the world so that they can make this world what it deserves to be, which is heaven on earth. Thank you very much for doing so.

Jill Celeste:

Thank you, Brett. That is exactly what I believe to Brett and I and that we need our Lightworkers to change the world. We at a bit of a crossroads, I believe, if I can help them, their marketing to do that, I am honored to do so.

Brett Dupree:

Awesome. Thank you so much and I will probably talk to you someday in the future.

Jill Celeste:

Okay, thanks, Brett.

Joyous Expansion Podcast Transcript Sujit Lalwani – Founder of Inspirational Unlimited, A Source of Positive News

Brett Dupree:

Hi Sujit, welcome to my podcast.

Sujit Lalwani:

Oh, it’s a pleasure being with you, Brett. I am looking forward to what we can together, you know, bring for listeners.

Brett Dupree:

You said you’ve been an entrepreneur about 16 years in your life.

Sujit Lalwani:

Yes. Oh, as an I would say that I started my career with sales and marketing when I was 18 and that was about four years and when I was 22 I kind of put my company in place. So I would say that it’s been about 11 years being an entrepreneur. But yes, 15 years in sales and marketing. Well, sales and marketing career initially was more of an independent associate, be more fed, like the control as an entrepreneur and all of it was more like you do it for yourself. I coded as 15 years of entrepreneurship journey.

Brett Dupree:

Got you started in wanting to become an entrepreneur?

Sujit Lalwani:

One of the things that really inspired me as I grew up was looking at my dad and how he worked as an entrepreneur. He started a small business, moved down to a city called Bengaluru in India and we were otherwise from a small town in a state called Rajasthan in India and he had moved to Bengaluru and he started his own business. He started dealing with false ceiling materials, plaster of Paris, and all of that. And he set up a business all by himself. He started employing people and as I saw him grow and have a little bit of control over his time as well, while there were days when he worked really hard. I mean weeks together, maybe sometimes even months. There were other days when he had all the time for the family. And as I saw him do that, there was an inclination right from the early stages of life. Even I would get into business one point of time as I grew up and I learned more about entrepreneurs, read their stories, how they built very successful companies, and how exciting it is to lead creation. And given that I had this whole inclination towards even creating something that will be lasting beyond your lifetime. So all of these kinds of synergize and move me to decide that I’m going to be an entrepreneur. Though I didn’t know what business I would eventually end up setting up. I was kind of very interested in the very fact that I would be involved with business entrepreneurship. That will make me a strong problem solver. Eventually, I would figure my way out of what I would want to be doing.

Brett Dupree:

I’m curious, what is the culture of entrepreneurship in India?

Sujit Lalwani:

Oh, the culture of entrepreneurship in India is kind of diverse. I mean and you have small businesses, you have medium segment enterprises, you have some very serious entrepreneurs and off late, it’s been the whole start of buzz for the last 10 years. So there’s a lot of venture capital angel funding coming in. While you know there were a lot of public regulations that didn’t favor strength and growing up a business. It’s in this era at this point in time, probably if you were to sit down with the millennials, every other person is so kicked about wanting to be an entrepreneur simply because you could address a pain point and solve the problem of so many people. So this whole problem-solving spirit I think is forming or beginning to form a strong base for the entrepreneurship culture in India.

Brett Dupree:

What problem are you looking to solve?

Sujit Lalwani:

It’s right from the very beginning. I think I have felt that there’s so much positivity and positivity media that’s lacking in the world. And I always felt every single morning when I woke up and I took the newspaper and I started reading, there’s so much crime, politics and there’s news about all around everything, a little bit of positive news. So I always had this vision. I would like to do something that brings a positivity media in, you know, in the world. And that’s how inspiration unlimited that is. IU got in place about seven and a half years ago and we’ve been doing good. We have a kind of dollar distribution channels and channel partners. We have a potential reach of almost close to 100 million downloads that all of these people offered to us with possibly an active readers base of almost about 10 million-plus people. So that’s how far we’ve gotten so far. But yes, I would like that. Anyone who wakes up and says, Hey listen, I would want to go down to a platform or a website that’s 100% positive and no gossips otherwise about any negative news content that’s otherwise going to put my energies down. I think they should look up to IU and come down to IU and spend enough time that could give them the kick for the day and they could get going. That’s what I’m addressing.

Brett Dupree:

Were you always a positive person growing up.

Sujit Lalwani:

I would say that having been exposed to times where resources were limited, so our family had a 10 by 10 feet or that is about a hundred square feet of home and we were like seven of us or maybe a little before that. Having five of us were able to join the family with my father’s rather than our other cousins, siblings. All of us came together and there would be summer holidays and some more of our far cousins will actually come down and we will be almost 20 people in that little house. So having seen a pack of resources and how everybody being together as a family still was very positive. We were quite hopeful about every other event that came by. Every new buy in the house was like a celebration when we learned all of those things about how you know you could have big dreams, have good goals, so there are challenges in life. You could still put up with it and celebrate every single day and look forward to every next coming day. And I think that made a big difference in how a positive mind sort of shaped up very early on in my life. And I think yes, optimistic and hopeful. I was from the early on and I could see a lot more positivity in the things I saw when I started growing up and my perspective enhanced. I saw that people couldn’t see solutions in a lot of situations, but I could see some maybe. I guess I was lucky. I was lucky on, yes, from quite an early time. Probably a very thought-provoking question, but I must appreciate that. Ha, haha.

Brett Dupree:

Was there a time where your positive outlook was challenged?

Sujit Lalwani:

Would definitely, you know, definitely. I mean early on it was very hopeful, cheerful when all of the pressure of the buck stops on my table wasn’t there the growing up years as an adult and maybe those times, I don’t think they were challenged that often, but as I moved per time, so I thought I needed to take accountability of filling up and starting to create my own financial growth income and then build my organization, talk my own company when I started doing all of that and probably then take a sponsor, we have my family and all of that. I think there were times when you’re challenged and you have much bigger goals than you can actually take on. Deadlines are strict, kind of impose targets for yourself and you’re learning so much more than you think know you have taken up on your table and you find yourself incompetent sometimes. So the every, so all of those situations I think puts you in a time where your GE talents and you don’t really see that hopeful at times. And then those doubts start looking in whether this is really going to happen and are all of these targets are going to get a to you. Am I even going to make it the destination or creation of the dream that I’m really dreaming about? Even the negative feedback kind of puts a sit back sometimes as you grew up and as you’re putting your footsteps forward, all the negative feedback at the beginning of which does not really sound like a challenge that you could take on. You’re expecting more of encouragement and as you start dealing and learning how to deal with rejections and disappointments or probably discouraging statements around those times, you know, doubts begin to lurk. But I think if you have a stronger positive outlook and you’re more hopeful than you’re optimistic, I think there’s a battle between the two most often in my life, yes, I tried to win the battle on the side of being hopeful and positive, but I wouldn’t say at all that high wasn’t challenged by the doubts and the mindsets that were not so positive at times and they were almost closed doors in front of me. So yes, I would say there are times when you just kind of lose everything and sometimes you just say, Hey, let me have a good sleep. Wake up the next day and think about it.

Brett Dupree:

Was a time you actually lost everything?

Sujit Lalwani:

Oh yes. I would say when I was in my sales and marketing career early on five years, I moved out of my college. I thought I’ll take that as a full-time career and a long-term livelihood and a career for myself. But I saw that one of the situations quite unforeseen, the organizing kind of topic because I wasn’t the owner of the organization at that point in time and there were a lot of my business associates otherwise who would a part of my organization as well. And we were collective, you know, selling the product and the company had, the business had to come to a hard, because we had to stop the operation so some time and it was almost like, you know, owning a manufacturing plant and sitting on top of its a leadership position and then almost seeing like the plant is going to be shut now that time as I would say that there was a massive change in direction needed. I had to figure my way out. I know and I had to have the people associated with me to figure the phase-out and make a decision of what’s going to be next because we knew that this is in going to continue. This is something we can pursue longer. Another basket that I put my eggs into. I knew I had to figure a whole new way out and that point I would say it was a terrific loss, especially of the dreams that were seen already. Put a pause altogether, put a new vision in place at that transition I think was the most challenging one and I think such times have repeated. Of course, I wouldn’t say they haven’t happened again, but you know in different patterns I would say or in different formats or in different styles. They do come again, but one reference in your past and you look ahead and say, Hey listen, if I could pull through them, I can pull through now and then your second reference happens and then the third time you’re like, Hey if I could pull it to the 10 I can still pull it through this morning. Maybe that’s when I really learned one of these phrases. One of my mentors, I mean I had several mentors. I would look up to a lot of people. Sometimes I found good qualities and people I would say I would learn from this person. I would learn from their qualities and good qualities and I would have more conversations with them and I would learn a lot about how they deal with things. It’s a lot of my mentors ended up teaching me that, Hey listen, just remember one thing, this too shall pass. So that gave me strength all the time. Whenever there were very tough times I would say, Hey, this too shall pass and I’ll figure my way out. And one-day things will be much better than they are right now. So I did have such occasions, Brett.

Brett Dupree:

One thing we like to do in the United States of America is too kind of prop up our supposed self-made millionaires or in people who are quote-unquote self-made. So it sounded, see here that you got a lot of mentors. So in India, do they share that idea of people should do it upon themselves, pull themselves up by their bootstraps, or do you guys encourage getting mentors and partners?

Sujit Lalwani:

I think there’s a mix of both, but I think over a period of time of me growing up in my journey, I think I’ve come to a conclusion that it’s very, very pivotal that we have mentors and of course we do have kind of culture that if somebody sees this mentor and they feels very comfortable and free to actually acknowledge their mentors as well. So a large part of our culture, yes, definitely encourages. Having a mentor and mentors really are free to actually coach the other people and empower them and grow them up in the other. You should somebody reach out to them. It’s not like everybody who’s made it to success is by default assigned, to mentor everybody else. But there are a lot of people that I see around that have made it a good position. And then you know, they engage a lot through various organizations and foundations to actually mentor others. And there are enough people who get mentored and look up to having mentors and that kind of a culture is around an India pretty much Brett.

Brett Dupree:

So it came to be an entrepreneur where your biggest mental roadblocks in selling and marketing and creating your own business?

Sujit Lalwani:

I think one of the biggest roadblocks for me was to take my business as a business. A lot of times I would get more emotional than I stuck to my business as a business. That I think one, it was one of the strongest roadblocks at the very onset. Sometimes when I knew that I was bleeding or that particular area was not performing well or we wouldn’t driving enough sales but I was really emotional about that particular vertical or idea. I would keep driving it further and further but the losses would keep increasing. Maybe we’ll bleed more than we would have or we should have and I think that was one of the earlier blocks and I learned through failures. Itself that once you have an idea and that’s really not taking by and given sufficient time efforts and experiments and your feedback loop has also kind of done some course correction for itself. You have to set apart that particular line of production and see the way that you are looking for the next opportunity of growth unless and until it’s an idea or a vision that all that you want to be building, but then you didn’t get your business model right as your course correction went by and you stuck to a business model, but that business model isn’t performing but you stick to the whole business model and division simply because you’re emotional about it. I think that was one of my strongest roadblocks, Brett.

Brett Dupree:

What came to starting inspirational unlimited magazines? What were your first steps? How did that go along?

Sujit Lalwani:

Me and my brother, we were having a discussion one day and he was like, Oh my God, there’s so much negativity in the newspapers that you’re not going to find so much positive news. There are no media that kind of takes leadership in doing this. At least a platform, at least an online website that covers a lot of positive news or at least publishes or positive articles and positive alone. Maybe something like that should come up. I’m very disappointed that nothing like that exists. So when he said all of that, I felt a tight time that stopped blaming and takes accountability for doing something. And maybe you know, when people tried, they failed. Or probably just didn’t click for them. Maybe we should do and see what are the challenges for the very next day, I came to my team and said, we were running a training company back then and the name of the training company was inspiration unlimited and was IU.

Sujit Lalwani:

That’s largely because I was a motivational speaker and I would deliver speeches and come back and people will find it so impactful that we’ll come back a couple of years or two years later to me and say that those two hours were very life-changing for me and the impact is so deep that I still carry that positive energy with me. And every time I feel low, I just close my eyes and recall your speech. So when first of this feedback came, I thought probably that’s very encouraging, that sweet of them. But then when that feedback repeated, I felt, okay, let me, let me understand this as this is an unlimited inspiration. This is lasting for much longer time in each of these people to let me named my company as inspiration unlimited and that’s how it started as a training company. But then the way they, me, and my brother had this conversation, I came back to my team and I said, we are launching an online media because I didn’t have money to go for the print media at that point in time and needed the expertise to do that.

Sujit Lalwani:

Given that the vision has started, given that the idea had come in and given that that conversation happened, I said this is still a part of the vision that I can feel so deep that this is something I would surely take leadership and accountability to do. No, no matter how difficult or how less informed I was at that point in time or how difficult it might get as the future unfolds because I might have particular of education very nearly because this was something not of my domain, but I still took the challenge and the leadership and said, listen, we’re going to launch this online media and we’re going to do it. And then the first question the team said everybody had was probably going to do it. And I said, but still one thing, but a search a little bit on what other online media exists. And that’s when I found that there were these blogs and they were these e-magazines and I said, we’re not going to be a blog alone.

Sujit Lalwani:

We’re going to be an e-magazine lawsuit. They were still not very strong differentiation between them, but the positioning was still different. So I said, e-magazine is the positioning we need. We are going to come across as online media. We are not going to be a blog alone. We’re going to have journalists, we’re going to have people getting interviewed. So all of that is going to happen. So we can position ourselves as online media. And we launched a small subscription box on our existing training website and said, Hey, Hey guys, in case you want to subscribe to the world and number one inspiration e-magazine kids where you would drop your email ID, we’re launching this newsletter the very next month. Then from the newsletter, we said, no, this is an e-magazine. So this is going to be a monthly edition of e-magazine that’s gonna come out, right.

Sujit Lalwani:

Drop it right into your inbox. And as we evolved for about two and a half years, like that month after month, I realized that it was best we made it an online platforms like Wikipedia, but lots of articles and positive news and so many categories. And that’s when we decided that we are going to go to blog-style e-magazine. And that’s how after about 20 months, in fact, we put IUEMAG.com in place. We bought a separate domain for [Inaudible] publishing. And then that’s how we became the online media. And that’s when we decided now is the time to probably have few ideas. The inspirational jockeys as we call it, the inspirational journalists interchangeably. We use that term as IJs, RJ is they will VJs. They were mjs but there were no ideas. I said we are going to have IJs and very uniquely people can be volunteering IJs or IJs because we at the point in time didn’t have the budget to hire too many IJs.

Sujit Lalwani:

We opened this position as volunteering ideas for so many people. People were interested. They came forward, we are going to cover stories and we are going to write for you because there’s a beautiful vision and that’s how we got a lot of support and that’s how the journey happened and about 4 years ago we opened the platform for media partnerships and online media partnerships with summits and Brett, you would be happy to know that we are now partnered with over 400 summits from across 35 plus countries. Some of the world’s best summits, in fact, sky drone technology, something like Skype from London, big data summit from Malaysia, the cafe Asia summit in Singapore. The women in the technology summit in the US. So some such very, wonderful summits to be a partner with at this point in time as precisely now partnership status that these summits give us is an online media partner. The dream bell came through seven and a half years ago as a seed that started, you know, today. And in fact, today if any part of the world, people who are listening right now, if they go down and Google inspirational e-magazine amongst the top three or probably, you know, I would not be wrong in making the claim that we are the number one link globally not, but day one we had the tagline, the number one inspiration e-magazine. So that’s something that sums up actually the study of online media Brett.

Brett Dupree:

Congratulations.

Sujit Lalwani:

Thank you.

Brett Dupree:

So let’s back up a little bit. You said you started in sales and marketing. How’d you go from sales and marketing into motivational speaking?

Sujit Lalwani:

In the platform that I was working with for sales and marketing, it was an educational package that we were supposed to market. Much of the marketing took place by inviting a lot of people to a seminar and then educating them about the product and then letting them know the pros and cons of the product and how you use it, educating them about how other people have used it and stuff, and then that’s how those sales were actually conducted. So that kind of continuously week after week put me into a cycle of delivering those seminars and then to keep a lot of my team members who were a part of my team who said, Hey listen, we are going to be a part of your team too. And this product as well put me into a place where I would organize leadership workshops and motivational training for all of these people and that’s how we would afford years with a lot of these kinds of events conducted.

Sujit Lalwani:

I knew that there was an ability to deliver sales training to a lot of people that I had and to be able to actually inspire them, give them leadership workshops, but I really didn’t know that inspirational speaker is something I could have become at that point in time. But as I researched more on the internet, I found some of these amazing people doing a good job. You know, I heard about Tony Robbins and [inaudible] and [inaudible] and all of these people. When I read about Stephen Covey, Oh, you know, Brian Tracy, Zig Ziglar, I felt, you know, there’s this is something I would love to pursue. I would love to deliver sales training to a lot of groups of people or companies and inspire them towards higher performance levels and better leads, you know, better leadership standards. And that’s when I decided this is something I would love to have as a part of my life, but I didn’t know this could be a livelihood or career.

Sujit Lalwani:

And that’s when I opened up-channel into my network and past the word out saying that if anyone’s keen on having me, deliver a particular workshop at a seminar or a leadership talk or other talk on any other particular agenda they might think could do justice, maybe they could discuss with me and I would be happy to come down. And back then I didn’t have any professional charges for it because I didn’t know if I could really charge for such gigs or this could be my career because I said I was already into sales and marketing. So when I opened up people kind of got interested that okay, we would love to invite you. We would love to give a trial because they knew that I wasn’t really charging any money. So they were like, okay, we would love to experiment if this goes great, we would love to invite you again, you know, and then maybe we could see how the whole thing can work on.

Sujit Lalwani:

We could organize a bigger gathering for you. So one after the other. I think those talks went really successful the way initial talks that I delivered and that’s how the word of mouth kind of spread and for almost over three years you will be surprised to know that. I never really charged for my inspirational talks because I didn’t know that those speaking gigs were something I could charge for. But yes, by the back of my mind after a year of delivering these speeches and also it was the same time and I had to move out of my earlier career, I knew that this could be a sound profession or a professional career for myself that I could really build please to start out with because I knew I had to continue as an entrepreneur. That would be something I would pursue. What is that first product or service that I can offer to my customers or clients?

Sujit Lalwani:

Because there was no other skill set that I thought I could put together as a service that I could offer because I was, it was not like I was a technology developer or anything like that. So I knew that motivational speaking and delivering these workshops was my strongest skill set. So I put together a product around that and I said, I’m more than willing to actually come forward and tell you what these sessions. So that’s how the shift from addressing a lot of those workshops and meetings for my business to now delivering it to people because I thought this is something I could pursue the longterm and I have the acumen and the knack flooded and the feedback that continuously came in that yes I was doing well. All of this moved me towards taking up motivation, speaking as a career Brett.

Brett Dupree:

Cool. So what lead you to write your book Life Simplified.

Sujit Lalwani:

This is, this is something I really love to answer because I was dealing with so many complexities myself and the so many answers I was seeking. I was each time trying to understand how do I deal with the situations I was being thrown out from having my college years, getting involved in the business early on, you know, not being able to manage my time for friends, a family going off, going, having an imbalance rather. And then probably I’m trying to understand how do I get this so-called work-life balance and which was pretty difficult for me. So I would always go this imbalance and find a new equilibrium also all of these things and then there were bigger questions like should I follow my heart? Should I go the traditional way? Should I take a job offer, my engineering is done? Should I take up a core technical job?

Sujit Lalwani:

Should I pursue higher education? So some of these questions at the back of my mind would keep looking despite the fact that I knew that I had to be an entrepreneur, what the inclination was towards that. But these questions always each time there were these times of doubts and times of concerns within me of what it is going to be next and probably a lot of things and people would come to me and ask, how do I deal with the situations or how do I resolve this particular challenge in my life? Besides the sales coaching, people would connect so deeply that they would even come down to me with their personal problems. Even trying to understand if they really walking on their purpose or not or probably if I could help them find their purpose in life or just the way I figured sales and marketing and speaking could be something close and near and dear to me.

Sujit Lalwani:

They would always have these questions. How do I figure it out? Could you help me do it? So when I saw that these many things exist around me, these many people have challenges around what’s the purpose of life, why am I doing, what am I doing? How do I figure out if I’m passionate about something, am I interested in it or can I get really get committed? Can I convert this into a career? I’m interested in music, but will I pay my bills? All of these things plus the complexities I was doing in my life. I think that brought me to actually write this book, but there’s one more thing I would love to share. I was a non-reader a perfect non-reader example until I turned about 18 or 18 and a half. I really, really had no interest in the reading the theory of self-help books or probably any other books like novels or anything apart from the academic books.

Sujit Lalwani:

And hence I thought that if I wrote a book that’s really a thick, too many pages, too much of content, non-readers like me who are actually in such complexities and still would want to read some books and help themselves, but they would go down to these books and not be able to read because they just don’t take to reading as well as the others do. So I decided I’m going to write a coffee table book, which is going to feel like a very wonderful conversation with the reader and make them feel very comfortable that okay, it’s okay. It’s totally okay if you are first a non-reader second, have a complex life third half these questions about life purpose, passion, and all the challenges. It’s totally okay. I do have it and this is how I resolved it and much like the habit of reading that I had that I would put a highlighter or underlying a few of those most important quotes and sentences.

Sujit Lalwani:

I thought, why not do something like put out a lot of these quotes on an entire page in so many different pages so that whenever people pick up this book, especially the ones that are really influenced by this book, no matter what phase they open, they have something to look back, take away as a memory. You’re probably just feeling that kick and then pull forward. So this book serves as a daily inspiration or dose for them. So this is how actually Life Simplified happens. And then I put the brackets that it’s applicable for these young people who are making their way up from 14 to 28 and especially non-readers. So that’s how Life Simplified might happen, Brett

Brett Dupree:

Awesome. So we’re coming to the end of our time together. One thing I like to ask my guests is to do one minute of motivation. You can think of this as if you have a time machine and you’re going back to your eight-year-old self and you want to convey the information needed to live a successful life, but you only have a minute, or you can think of that as taking your entire life’s message purpose and honing it down to a minute. So are you ready to go?

Sujit Lalwani:

This is very, very exciting. Of course, I am ready to go. So maybe you could go three, two, one and tell me to start and then I go over it. But I really love this idea of breadth. I would have one. I appreciate that. All right.

Brett Dupree:

Start.

Sujit Lalwani:

All right. So one of the things that if I look back in my life and you know, I would like to advise myself at the onset if I met, uh, it would be, if you really want to go very, very far in life and be very successful, you have to start really early. You cannot delay it. I started at 18 and I still feel that was quite late. So I advise every single listener right now. No matter where you are, what you’re doing, this is the best time to start working on yourself, towards your goals. Plan them out, put a to-do list, put a to be list for yourself, decide what you’re really going to be or what you want to become, what kind of list you want to address, what kind of a bucket list you want to put for yourself for this one life and start now. The second thing that I want to share is if there’s any idea any dream that you have, do not put it off for later. That should be just one mantra and that does it now. There shouldn’t be, I do it next, I’ll do it later. Or probably this is an idea that’s capital intensive for people who are wanting to start businesses. This is the ideal capital intensive. I don’t have support. I don’t have people. I do not know if this is really gonna work, but all of those aside and say do it now. The third thing that I want to share with everybody is the best things that really helped me to get so much of leadership abilities and talents were mentoring and helping people because that just made me so comfortable, joyous deeds that could not be paid back in casual kind.

Sujit Lalwani:

This is something I would love to tell everyone. Corporate social responsibility is doing great. The world now needs individually, socially responsible people. Individual social responsibility is on the radar and I would sum it up seeing that, Hey guys, it’s high time. They realized they’ve been human beings for a very long time. It’s time to become human doings. All of this is what I would tell myself, the earliest self that just started out and this is something I have for all the listeners I hope I would hear from you as a human doing and not just being human beings. That’s it, Brett.

Brett Dupree:

Thank you so much, Sujit for coming to my podcast. I really enjoyed listening to your story of how you created an inspirational online newspaper. The positive news is very needed in today’s world as in my humble opinion. There are a lot more positive things happening now than ever in the entirety of human history. And it’s nice that somebody is out there pointing it out that you know what, we are not that bad of a species as people like to point us out to be. So thank you for making a positive contribution to your community and thank you for making this world a better place.

Sujit Lalwani:

Thank you so much Brett for having me on your podcast and in fact, I would really, really appreciate so many more people coming down to your podcasts and sharing their stories. And I also appreciate the fact that you really believe that positive media like this is so much needed. And I also appreciate the fact that you pointed out very rightly that that is more positive things than ever in the history that are happening. But so so few actually come to the light and we are very happy to be working towards it. And I think podcasts like yourself are also a terrific impact. You know, much in alignment with creating positive content on the internet, kudos to you too. And we will be very happy to share all of your broadcasts or anything and on your podcast that needs to be shared with all our readers. It’ll be a pleasure for us to kind of partner you and take all of your podcasts as our content, and then push it across to our readers to that so many more people could actually benefit from the kind of podcast you’re creating. You know, because it’s, there’s so much synergy between the kind of work we do. So thank you so much for having me on your show Brett.

Brett Dupree:

I appreciate that. Greatly made your day be special.

Sujit Lalwani:

Thank you. We should the same Brett. Thank you so much.

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